signicat rabobank

Press Release: Rabobank and Signicat launch Digital Identity Service Provider (DISP)

Rabobank and Signicat are entering the Dutch identity market together by providing digital services to businesses, supporting them in servicing their clients.

This joint Digital Identity Service Provider (DISP) offers a range of online login, identity, signature and archiving solutions under the banner of Rabo eBusiness. It provides optimal convenience for a range of businesses, including insurance, energy and leasing companies as well as other financial services providers. It simplifies and improves the digital transformation they are under pressure to achieve.

Rabo eBusiness helps businesses to shape their online services in an easier, more reliable and efficient way to achieve higher online conversion. Consumers can log onto the merchant’s website using one of the identity services provided by Rabo eBusiness and can then, for example, sign a contract online. The platform is easy to integrate into the existing business processes using API technology.

Rabobank will initially focus on five customer groups: energy, telecom and insurance companies, healthcare institutions and financial services providers. Rabo eBusiness services will make it easy for them to enable functions such as onboarding new customers, signing contracts digitally and offering a dashboard for invoices or expense claims.
The market for DISPs opened on 1st April 2017 within the framework of iDIN.

Alexander Zwart, responsible for Online Channels & Access at Rabobank, explains that Rabobank already has a good starting position, having: ‘Advisory skills, a large market share in the business market, operational services and a mature salesforce. In order to be able to offer technology and a high-quality and safe range of products, we have opted not to develop it ourselves, but instead to collaborate with a well-established strategic player. Signicat has a proven Digital Identity Service platform that is considered leading in the Nordics, a mature digital identity market.’

Signicat in turn wants to expand its presence in the Dutch market. Gunnar Nordseth, Chief Executive Officer of Signicat: ‘We have been operating for some time as an identity service provider in the Nordics and are currently expanding into other parts of Europe. The Netherlands is a strategically important market for us and a European hub that has great potential for digital identity, signature and archiving services. Collaborating with an innovative bank such as Rabobank gives us the opportunity to fulfil our ambition.’

The platform has been designed to grow in tandem with market demands and can consequently be expanded to include additional services. This lays the foundation for achieving Rabobank’s strategic ambition to help its customers with the digitisation of their services.

-ENDS-


About Signicat:
Based in Trondheim, Norway, and founded in 2007, Signicat operates the largest Digital Identity Hub in the world, offering the only complete identity platform in the market and trusted to reduce the burden of compliance in highly regulated markets. With Signicat, service providers can build and leverage existing customer credentials to connect users, devices and even ‘things’ across channels, services and markets transforming identity into an asset rather than a burden. By ditching manual, paper based processes and replacing them with digital identity assurance, customer onboarding is accelerated and access to services is made simple and secure. Signicat’s Identity Hub is a complete solution to that offers compliance and a route to better customer engagement.
www.signicat.com

About Rabobank:
Rabobank is an international financial services provider operating on the basis of cooperative principles. It offers retail banking, wholesale banking, private banking, leasing and real estate services. As a cooperative bank, Rabobank puts customers’ interests first in its services. Rabobank is committed to being a leading customerfocused cooperative bank in the Netherlands and a leading food and agri bank worldwide. Rabobank employs approximately internal and external 50,000 people. Rabobank Group is active in 40 countries.
www.rabobank.com

For more information, please contact:

Rabobank
Margo van Wijgerden, Press Officer
+3130 2160967, margo.van.wijgerden@rabobank.nl

Signicat
Imran Majid, PR Manager
+44 203 824 9205, Imran.Majid@ccgrouppr.com


For more information about DISP, visit:
DISP

Can blockchain technology be useful to digital identity?

The word blockchain brings out many associations. I guess for most of you, Bitcoin comes first. And maybe other cryptocurrencies like Ripple and Ethereum. From there, you probably think about illegal buying and dark web, and anonymity. Yes, true. As with any type of fiat currency, you can also use cryptocurrencies to buy illegal stuff, and to be anonymous. But remember that blockchain is technology, and technology is only bad if it is used in a bad way.

Why can blockchain be useful for identities?
Anyway, this post is not about money but about identities. What are the reasons to consider blockchain to hold digital identities? And what are the properties of blockchain, which can be useful for identities.

For one, a blockchain is distributed, so there is no central authority which manages your identity. And it is immutable, which means that as soon as an identity is stored on the blockchain, it can never be removed. These properties means that your digital identity can not be purged. This would prevent any government from taking away the identity from people based on religion, ethnicity or other attributes, and you would be in control of your own identity. This is often referred to as sovereign identity.

Proof of concept with the sovereign identity idea
Signicat has been doing a proof of concept with the sovereign identity idea. Below are the components of this PoC:

Attribute storage
Each attribute is encrypted and stored separately. This means that if the encryption is cracked on one attribute, only data for this attribute is exposed. For example that somebody is born on January 1st 1972, that somebody is over 18, or that is somebody has a given Nationality. But not who. And even if two records are broken, there is nothing indicating that these belong to the same individual. To know this connection, you  must have the private key.

Attribute verification
To ensure a validity of an attribute, an eIDP (electronic identity provider) or eAP (electronic attribute provider) is involved. This could be public eID providers (such as BankID in Norway and Sweden or NemId in Denmark), consumer identity providers (such as Facebook or Google), it could be a bank, a government, or even a group of friends. Before storing the attribute record on the blockchain, it is validated by one or more of these. This means that the recipient of the attribute can verify the validity of the attribute.

Exposing an attribute
If you want to provide an attribute to somebody, for example that you are over 18, you send the record ID and the encryption key for this record to the recipient. This will prove that the record is yours, and that it is valid (by checking the attribute provider validation). The encryption key can only be used to decrypt the given record, so the owner is in control of, what is being shared. Additional measures are used to prevent replay of the attribute, for example that the recipient uses this to another party.

Private key storage
A user needs a private key to identify his or her records on the blockchain. A challenge is that users lose their private key, and thereby lose access to their blockchain information. By using a key splitting algorithm, the private key is split into as many parts as there are nodes in the blockchain and each node is given one part. In addition, the algorithm defines how many parts are needed to construct the key. If there for example are 20 nodes, you could require 10 parts to reconstruct the key. Any 10 arbitrary parts will suffice. By setting up rules for releasing the private key parts, requiring one or more eIDPs or aIDPs to prove your identity, a node can release one part, thereby allowing the key owner to reconstruct the private key.

Attribute and identity providers
The eAPs and eIDPs will be approved by the blockchain. Only the approved nodes are trusted, which is especially important for the release of private key parts. If a provider is no longer trusted, it will be removed from the trustlist.

Finally a word of warning: Before going all-in on an identity solution (or any solution using sensitive data) on the blockchain, privacy must be considered carefully. When data is on the chain, there is no way to change it, so there is no room for error in the initial setup.

Blogpost by: John Erik Setsaas, Identity Architect
Twitter: @jsetsaas

Contact us


Missed Finovate this year? Watch Signicats demo video

Signicat demo video from Finovate Europe 2017

At Finovate Europe 2017 in London, Signicat demonstrated rapid onboarding and digital signing using Signicat Assure and Signicat Sign.

Signicat Assure uses a combination of existing national eIDs, digital verification of identity papers (ID cards, passports, utility bills etc), commercial identities (for example Facebook and Google) and other methods to verify an identity. The strength of the assurance lies in combining several methods. Signicat Sign allows customers to sign digital documents, which ensures integrity (that the content is not changed), origin (that the signer can be verified) and non-repudiation (that the sender cannot deny the signature).

In case you missed it. Watch Signicats demo video here:

More about Finovate Europe: Finovate Europe

Finovate Europe 2017

When is an electronic signature legally binding?

When is an electronic signature legally binding?

In the digital age, we want to replace the good old handshake and the handwritten ink signature with the more modern and flexible electronic signature.
In the Nordic countries, we are known for our high penetration and coverage of internet access and mobile devices. Important key drivers for the success of building advanced digital services. This has given us many years of experience with electronically signed contracts, resulting in better customer experience and lower handling cost.

With more than 10 years of experience with national eID schemes, as well as with electronic signatures, the alignment and adoption to the national legislation is well in place. At the end of the day it all comes down to the strength of the evidence being put together.

10 years is still a long time and solutions evolve based on requirements and experience.

New EU regulation replaces electronic signature directive

eIDAS (EU regulation #910/2014) replacing the old Electronic Signatures Directive 1999/93/EC, is stating that qualified electronic signatures have the same legal status as a handwritten signature, and must not be rejected.

Up until know the requirements to a qualified signature has been so costly and the user experience has in general been bad, so the adoption has not been widespread and adopted. This has resulted in alternative “solutions” to qualified signatures as mentioned below.

The alternative to qualified electronic signature is called advanced electronic signature. The complexity and requirements in the advanced electronic signature is lower, and have been the basis for many of the successful national eID schemes like BankID in Norway and Sweden and NemID in Denmark.

High priority on both compliance and user friendly electronic signing

At Signicat we are working with our 3rd generation of the “electronic signing ceremony”, where user experience and mobile channels receive top priority.  Our customers are eager to follow the adoption of more user-friendly electronic signing flows, but at the same time focused on compliance and do not take any chances at all in this respect.
Since there are no standards or practical definitions setting the scene for advanced electronic signature, Signicat asked an external 3rd party to do an assessment of our 3rd generation electronic signing ceremony.

We commissioned an international law firm –  Bird & Bird – to do this assessment covering Denmark, Norway, Sweden and Finland focusing on two areas:

– The national eID scheme (electronic signature) in relation to EU legislation (eIDAS – AES – QES)
– The implementation of electronic signed agreements in the national legislation

The conclusion is that the Signicat Signature solution in combination with the national eID schemes covered, comply with the level corresponding to AES (Advanced Electronic Signature) and this has been adopted in the national legislations.

Read the full assessment

If you want to read the full assessment, please fill in the form below to get your copy.

Regulation creates opportunities

2017: A year of new regulations and new opportunities

Regulation creates opportunities

AML4, PSD2, eIDAS and GDPR. The deadlines for implementing these new EU directives and regulations are fast approaching.  Banks, financial institutions and other businesses dealing with personal data are rushing to do what is required to be compliant with the new regulations.

On the other hand, some banks are starting to see that new regulations also creates new opportunities. Take for instance PSD2: It is true that it requires banks to give access to account data to third parties that may be potential competitors. But it also creates an opportunity for banks to leverage their relations to their end customers by offering Strong Customer Authentication (SCA) to third parties.

Banks are uniquely positioned to do this. In some regions, like the Nordics, the infrastructure is already in place. In other regions where this is yet not the case, the banks are in the best position to provide SCA based on identity data they already hold about their customers.

Access to strong eID would be of great value to the fintechs and challengers trying to establish themselves in the market. By offering access to third parties, banks would accomplish two things: Creating a market for value-added services on top of the basic services required by PSD2 and strengthening the relations to the end-customer using the strong eID from the bank to access other services. It could also be used as part of an attractive value proposal to corporate customers of the bank.

Banks cooperating to provide strong eIDs to third parties

The concept of banks cooperating to provide strong eID to third parties is older than the new wave of regulation. It started in the Nordics with BankID and similar initiatives more than 10 years ago. The banks saw that they could profit from selling access to their strong eID to third parties. By making their eID interoperable between banks (as in a federation), they could also increase the frequency of use of the eID, thus creating stronger bonds to the end customer.

What happened in the Nordics in the bank industry is now expanding to other regions and other verticals. Cross-industry schemes and federations for eID are being established by banks, telecommunications companies and others who want to exploit the network effect of providing electronic identity across industries and businesses.

One such example is the partnership between Dutch banks to establish a federation of electronic identity, called iDIN. Another is the MyBank initiative by the EBA. A third is GSMA Mobile Connect, which is driven by the Telco industry.

The common denominator of these initiatives is that they connect existing electronic identity together in federations. Thus, a customer of a Dutch bank can use his online banking login to establish a customer relationship with an ecommerce retailer or a fintech providing account aggregation services.

Initiatives like the Dutch iDIN and MyBank has the potential for rapid deployment of Strong Customer Authentication. They build on existing electronic identity that already is in frequent use for Internet banking, sidestepping the need for costly and time-consuming deployment of new electronic identity.

Now is the time to act

In 2014 Consult Hyperion’s David Birch published the book “Identity is the new money”. That was before PSD2, eIDAS and GDPR. Now, with the effect of the new EU regulations, the title of the book is probably more true than ever.

Signicat has been aware of the opportunities related to new regulations for some time, and we started to expand our cloud based range of services for strong electronic trust outside of the Nordic region two years ago.

PSD2 and other regulations are not only about compliance. They provide opportunities for banks and fintechs to position themselves as being more innovative and forward thinking than the competitors. The ability to provide strong identification and authentication of customers will be a key factor for success.

Signicat is a pioneer in this field with 10 years of experience and over 250 banks, fintechs, insurance companies and government agencies using our online services for strong eID and eSignature.  This gives us a unique position to help European banks to explore the opportunities related to PSD2 and other European regulations.

by Gunnar Nordseth

EBA PSD2

Signicat welcomes PSD2 Strong Customer Authentication

Yesterday Thursday February 23rd the EBA (European Banking Authority) published the final draft RTS (Regulatory Technical Standards) on Strong Customer Authentication (SCA) and common and secure communication under article 98 of directive 2015/2366 (PSD2).

On the first draft RTS the EBA received as much as 244 responses, some of those have influenced this final draft and some not. This final draft RTS is 153 pages of information, guidelines and rules to implement and follow to be PSD2 compliant in terms of Strong Customer Authentication (SCA).

Signicat has been helping our customers for almost 10 years with Strong Customer Authentication and grown our support for many different digital identity methods covering both government schemes, commercial eIDs, proprietary eIDs and of course self-issued eIDs.

Please find the final draft RTS here:

If you want more information about our award winning digital identity cloud based eID HUB or want to receive news and updates from the digital identity space, please get in touch by filling in the form and we will keep you updated.

Frictionless

Signicat on-boarding report from 2016 still topical

Signicat on-boarding report from 2016 still topical

Early 2016 we conducted a market research revealing some of the challenges consumers are facing when they want to change bank or “buy” financial services. This underlines the need for frictionless and great user experience if you want to sell more or attract new customers  for your financial services.

The research told that more than 40% abandons due to too complicated on-boarding processes. Find the full report here.

Last week Chris Lemmon at FStech did a post on a new survey with same conclusions as the Signicat report – consumers won’t spend more than 20 minutes on an application for financial products online. Find the article here.

Take a look at some of our customer references and learn how we have helped them improving their customer experiences entering the digital age.

Blockchain as tool for improving the identity handling

As written in previous blog posts blockchain and digital identity are 2 very different technologies and the blockchain killerapp within digital identity is yet to been discovered. We recognize blockchain as a promising technology with many interesting angles and as part of our strategy to pursue the blockchain as tool for improving the identity handling, Signicat joined the Dutch Blockchain Hackathon (https://blockchainhackathon.eu/) this weekend with a team of hardcore eID and blockchain resources.

At the end, we showed a fully working demo of a blockchain solution, which addressed the following issues.

Safe storage of the user’s private key
One of the challenges with any digital identity schemes which is based on private keys, is that this private key typically is stored on a device in the possession of a user, and if this device is lost, the private key is gone with it. There is no way to get the private key back.

Our demo showed a model where the private key is split into parts, and stored across the nodes of the blockchain, in such a way that no single node has the complete key, but multiple nodes are required to reconstruct the key. The user must prove that he or she is the owner of the key, by using one or more identity providers, as explained in the next section.

Independence of identity provider
In typical identity schemes, the user is dependent on ONE identity provider. If this identity provider is compromised, or if this identity provider decides either to discharge a user or to take control of the private key, it can do so. Instead, we set up multiple identity providers, where the user must authenticate with several of these at the same time to retrieve the private key. In addition, the identity providers must be approved by the blockchain, so an identity provider which has been compromised, will be excluded.

The worst-case scenarios are where a government issuing identities, decides to target a group of users based on an attribute, for example deleting them. The blockchain will provide safe storage, and the users would have other identity providers, e.g. social media or even a private community.

Privacy, and putting the user in control of attribute sharing
A user is often asked to provide some information, e.g. being over a given age or living in a specific country. The current solution is to provide an identity paper, which shows ALL this information and much more, which is not required to share.

By having each attribute verified by one or more IdPs, and then encrypted by different encryption keys, the user can expose any subset of the attributes to the recipient. So, it is possible to share only the date of birth, or even the derived “I’m over 18”, if this is verified by an (or more) identity provider.

We got some blockchain hands on and a working demo to show how blockchain can be used including additional blockchain insights working intense together and meeting a lot of other blockchain nerds J

Signicat take these new technologies very seriously and we therefore have a dedicated blockchain team and innovation test / demo platform to test our latest blockchain ID software on.

By John Erik Setsaas, Identity Architect, Signicat

 

Signicat winner of the Norwegian Fintech Achievement Award 2017!

Oslo, Norway 15th February 2017 – We’re thrilled that Signicat has been crowned winner of the Norwegian Fintech Achievement Award 2017 at .

   

Signicat, the first and largest identity assurance provider in the world, has been named the winner of the Norwegian Fintech Achievement Award 2017. Presented at the Future of Fintech & Banking conference at Oslo Fintech Fest last week, Signicat has been recognised for its outstanding achievement in the Norwegian fintech sector.

The award recognises the Norwegian Fintech company that can demonstrate innovation, market traction and global potential. Fintech is one of the hottest technology segments in Norway today, and the Fintech scene is growing rapidly. With the best digital infrastructure in the world, a population with 98% access to the internet, and a near cashless society, Norway is the perfect breeding ground for Fintech innovation.

 

 

Signicat expands eID coverage to the Netherlands with iDIN and DigiD

Signicat, the first and largest identity assurance provider in the world, now supports two new digital identities in the Netherlands, iDIN and DigiD, increasing its coverage of eIDs across Europe.

These two digital identities give Dutch citizens easy, secure access to any financial or municipal service they use.

iDIN, created by a partnership between Betaalvereniging Nederland (the Dutch Payments Association) and the government, is currently being piloted by a number of banks as well as Signicat. The identity scheme is designed to repeat the success of the Nordic BankID system by providing digital identities with multiple use cases.

Instead of providing identity credentials when signing up to a new service, customers can be authenticated through their bank – a process that is convenient for the customer and more secure for the service provider. The service is set to go live in early 2017, and existing Signicat customers have testing access now.

iDIN and DigiD available to existing Signicat customers now

DigiD is the government-issued digital identity which can be accepted by any Dutch organisation with the authority to use a customer’s social security number, or BSN. While iDIN has been created to provide a digital ID for financial services, DigiD is used for many public services, such as healthcare, legal aid, and utilities. As well as proving your identity when corresponding with the government DigiD can also authorise a third-parties to act on your behalf. As with iDIN, DigiD is available to all existing Signicat customers now.

“Our aim is to be able to establish trust between customers and businesses, and the integration of these two new digital IDs in the Netherlands mean we can continue to realise this goal across Europe,” said Marco Gouw, Sales Director Signicat Netherlands. “The integration of iDIN and DigiID into our platform means that businesses can quickly and securely onboard Dutch customers in minutes – and have trust in their identities – without any need for excessive paperwork.”

With support from The Research Council of Norway.

Read more

Signicat Sign Demo

GlobalData review of Signicat Assure and Signicat Sign demo at FinovateEurope 2017

Signicat Sign demo at Finovate Europe 2017

Sam Murrant, Senior Payments Analyst at GlobalData has shared his review of our Signicat Assure and Signicat Sign products.

Digital ID based on multiple factors
Signicat Assure builds a digital ID for consumers based on multiple factors including ID documents and social media presence, while Signicat Sign enables digital signatures with the same legal force as physical ones. Reviewed by Senior Payments Analyst Samuel Murrant.

Check out the scorecard here.

If you would like more information about Signicat Assure have a look here: Signicat Assure

Signicat Sign Demo
Want to have a look at Signicats Finovate demo video? Continue reading

Blog: Strong identification to explode in Finland

New Finnish legislation and Finnish Trust Network (FTN) will expand strong identification to more and more online services, where it does not exist today, says Country Manager, Antti Harsunen from Signicat.

“At the moment we are at a run rate of a couple of million authentications per month . We believe that next year at this point we are looking at 3-4 times the figures.”says Harsunen.

“We are aggregating all the major Northern and Central-European electronic identities (eID) and Finland has been important market to our company since 2008.”

Finnish Communications Regulatory Authority (FICORA) is working together with other actors in the coming FTN community how to implement the legislation, which applies from 1st May 2017 onwards. FTN consists of eID providers and aggregators.

The objective for the change in the legislation is to make Finland a more favorable environment for digital services and to adopt strong identification easily. A big change is the aggregation services, which acts as a broker between the online services and the eID provider enabling a one-stop shop for the service providers to access all the eID’s with one agreement.

Until now, the service provider is required to make agreements with all eID providers (10 banks + Mobile operator). It has slowed down the implementations and wider adaptation of the strong eID’s in Finland.

For example, only the government online services have more than 1,000 contracts with the different eID providers!

“With the change of the mode of operation is analogous to the Payment Services Act reform in 2010. Thanks to the amendment, online payments through Payment Service Providers (PSP’s) began to become more common in Finland strongly,” says Harsunen.

From 2009 to 2013, the number of online payments increased by 23.1 million units to 56.3 million units. This means almost 2.5-fold increase in a few years.

Signicat believes that strong authentication is increasing particularly strongly in the future, for example in health care, insurance and real estate sector. Signicat’s traditional ”home industry” has been financial sector. The company’s customers in Finland include Lähi-Tapiola, Fennia, If P & C, DNA, Nordnet, SEB and Santander, as well as a number of European financial sector companies.

The new law requires the identification of the proxy service providers approved by FICORA.

“On May 1st 2017, we are ready to provide mediation service as an official one-stop shop for all means of identification. We have provided technical services in the Finnish market since 2008 and now we can finally offer it also contractually! “, says Harsunen.

News service called Digital Identity Service Provider

”There is a  new service provisioning category called Digital Identity Service Provider (DISP). The DISP’s offer Identity On Demand-services for their customers, regardless of geography or eID. Signicat has extremely strong expertise and background of being a DISP for a decade and we aim to be the leader of the pack also in the future”, sums Harsunen.

Signicat’s Mikael Kemppainen is responsible for Presales in Finland. He believes that aggregating eID’s through a DISP makes perfect sense technically as well. ”Alone in Finland there are 11 integrations to various eID providers, why not use a DISP like us with only one integration? The biggest advantages are achieved in international companies that operate in several markets”.

Contacts in Finland:

www.signicat.fi

Country Manager Antti Harsunen
antti.harsunen@signicat.com, +358 40 687 9090

Presales executive Mikael Kemppainen
mikael.kemppainen@signicat.com, +358 40 701 7774

identity crisis FinTech

Blog: Are we heading for an identity crisis in FinTech?

Are we heading for an identity crisis in FinTech

Banks are, or are fast becoming, digital businesses and the customers they are competing for are “always on” – used to services accessible from any device and tailored to individual preferences. This brings its own set of problems, not least of which is verifying a customer’s identity online.

Establishing if someone is who they say they are in today’s virtual world is a major headache for banks and fintechs, thanks to the strict regulations they operate under and the difficulty in providing non-physical, verifiable forms of identity.

Consumers are demanding mobile first, digital services, and financial service providers need to meet stringent KYC processes that are rooted in a physical world at odds with today’s digital consumer. If this security process means popping into the branch or copying a 20-digit code from a SMS to an app, customers simply won’t buy it.

For fintech challengers, keen to steal business away from established providers, it needs to be simple for prospective customers to access and use their services, and, crucially, to trust them as much as current providers. Without this trust it won’t matter how innovative the service or how slick the mobile experience is – customers will stick with who they already have faith in to keep their details safe.

We can see this effect in action – security has improved beyond passwords and mother’s maiden name-type questions, but at the expense of convenience. Over 40% of applications for financial services products are abandoned. The current approach to identity doesn’t fit with either the shift to digital or the increasingly global nature of financial markets.

ID proliferation in the post-password era
The market has begun to address the issue. Major technological breakthroughs are being made such as new biometric techniques – skull-produced sounds will soon supplement fingerprints and facial recognition; projects such as HSBC’s voice recognition service; and use cases like consumer ID credentials stored in Apple Wallets, are all part of the effort to solve one of the biggest problems in tech: “how do I prove who I am, simply, securely and digitally?”

Organisations like Google, which announced Project Abacus earlier this year, are developing proprietary solutions that banks and other players can use to authenticate customers. Industry bodies like FIDO and the GSMA are creating standards designed to govern how IDs are managed and individuals are authenticated. At the same time regulators are mandating that providers enable strong authentication as part of PSD2 and eIDAS efforts to harmonize the single market in Europe.

While these efforts are important to addressing this issue, the mix of proprietary, industry and public policy approaches have created a plethora of different technologies, standards and alliances with only one clear result: confusion.

There is currently no “killer” identity solution. For every service, whether it’s online banking, insurance, online shopping, government eIDs or something else, a different ID is being used.

An identity crisis?
Everyone understands that the reliance on passwords cannot continue, and that existing authentication approaches sacrifice usability for security. However, creating multiple authentication methods is not the solution to consumers having to remember and manage multiple passwords.

With financial institutions and fintechs desperately seeking a solution to the problem, and consumers suffering from password/PIN fatigue, the solution is simplicity, ubiquity and scale, not more fragmentation. There needs to be a common approach or underlying infrastructure that solves the following problems:

  • Usability – consumers need a fast, simple and consistent method with minimal friction, across channels, markets and service providers.
  • Security – with fast changing regulation and increased threat from fraudsters, the approach must be ‘banking grade’ to offer providers and individuals peace of mind.
  • Scalability – consumers want to be able to use the same method and ID credentials across service providers and markets, and providers want to be able to use the same system across all channels and countries to grab market share.

Unless addressed, the identity crisis will mutate into market inertia. Providers will wait for the right solution to adopt and throw their weight behind. Meanwhile consumers will resist shifting from passwords and PINs until a better alternative is in place.

Enter digital identity
A different approach is needed – one that tackles the core problem: how can a consumer establish an ID credential that can be used across multiple services, standards and technologies?

For this to work in any sort of ubiquitous, scalable manner we must first create a single, robust digital ID and determine how it can be passported across services and markets. The irony is that almost every consumer has at least one trusted digital identity – either government or industry scheme – that could provide the answer. For example, Scandinavia has BankID, Estonia has ID kaart and the UK has GOV.verify.

So rather than reinventing the wheel, financial service providers should use the existing public and private eID infrastructure that is gathering pace across Europe and beyond. The trick will be pooling them together into one central area so that they can be used across multiple geographies, multiple providers and for multiple purposes.

A federated approach
Rather than making their customers go through onerous KYC processes, organisations in regulated markets, such as financial institutions, can use existing customer credentials via an ID hub. Customers can register and use services quickly and simply, and financial service providers can accelerate expansion, boost market share, accelerate regulatory compliance and potentially capitalise on some of the enormous investment already made in KYC.

The financial services sector is undergoing the biggest transformation in its long history. Regulators across the globe want to open the market to competition and enforcing ever-stricter legislation. Meanwhile revenues are declining, cyber-attacks are increasing, and fintech challengers are competing on services that were traditionally the preserve of established banks.

Digital identity has the potential to be the foundation from which providers can create better, digitally-native services that are highly secure yet easily accessible to new and existing customers regardless of where they are. Without a new approach, all financial providers will be paralysed by the identity crisis.

By Gunnar Nordseth, CEO, Signicat

gunnar nordseth signicat

CEO Signicat, Gunnar Nordseth

Gunnar Nordseth has more than 20 years of experience with information security, PKI and digital identity, and has since 2006 been CEO of Signicat.

Blog: Introduction to digital seals

john-erik-photo-2014-07

Identity Architect – John Erik Setsaas

One of the trust services addressed by eIDAS (EU regulation 2014/910) is electronic seals. This post will describe what electronic seals are, and how they can be used.

Electronic seals have the same encryption as electronic signatures, and the result is in both cases a protected document. When a document is sealed, it is possible to verify the origin of the document, as well as detecting if changes have been done to the document after the seal was added. Many people think that if you save a document as a PDF, this document cannot be modified. This is unfortunately not true – a PDF document can be easily edited in Adobe Acrobat and other PDF editors. However, if a seal is added to the PDF document, Adobe Reader (and possibly other PDF readers) will report if the document has been tampered with.

signature-vs-sealSo what is the difference between an electronic signature and an electronic seal? The simple answer is that a signature is added by a person, while a seal is added by an organization.

A little more complex answer is that an electronic signature is added by a natural person, i.e. a human being, and that the signature is added by this person performs some action when adding the signature. This action typically involves some sort of authentication, where the user proves that she is who she claims to be. An electronic seal is added by a legal person, for example an organization. There is typically no human action involved in this, which makes electronic seals easy to include in existing business processes.

When do you want to use an electronic seal and not an electronic signature? If your organization is producing documents that are sent to other parties, and you want to ensure the integrity of these documents, electronic seals can be a good solution. The sealing of the documents can be integrated into the business process, ensuring that all produced documents are automatically sealed, without any human interaction.

add-digital-seal

It is equally simple to include verification of received documents in the business process. This could then automatically reject documents where the seal is not valid, or start a manual verification if there are any doubts about the signature.

verify-digital-seal

One use case for using electronic seals is an auditor. The result of an audit is a report, which is used to prove to a 3rd party that some requirements are fulfilled. The auditor generates a report, which is sent to the organization and this is then forwarded as a proof of conformance. Sealing this report, ensures that nobody can tamper with the report, and that the document is produced by the auditor, and not by somebody else.

Universities produce diplomas for students, which can typically be downloaded as PDF. This makes it very easy for a student to modify the diploma and alter anything from grades to subjects. It is also very simple to create fake diplomas. A quick Google search for “fake diploma” returns more then 350.000 hits. The consequence of this is that an employer may hire under-qualified workers, which is at best a business risk, and at worst lethal in businesses such as healthcare. By electronically sealing the diplomas, it is simple to verify that these are genuine, that they originate from the correct university and that it is not tampered with. An automatic check of diplomas when screening incoming job applications, could discard any diplomas which are fake.

Electronic seals could also be used for securing the integrity of bank statements, employment confirmation, identity papers, deeds, policy documents, training certificates, tax statements, and many others.

Signicat offers simple-to-use APIs, both for adding seals to documents and for verifying electronic seals. A document can be sealed by including a web-service call which is connected to a business process. Signicat will add the electronic seal, and return the sealed document, which then can be distributed.

To verify a received document, a web-service call will return the health of the sealed document, including a simple “traffic light” status. A check of this traffic light can be included in the business process, to reject obviously tampered-with documents, and approve verified documents. Questionable documents can be forwarded to a manual check.

Blog: Work hard, play hard – in the safe sandbox

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Regulatory and industrial sandboxes were up for discussion at yesterday’s Finance IT Day in Copenhagen. Signicat announced the first ever identity sandbox for FinTech companies.

Written by Lars Møller Kristensen, Product Marketing Manager, Signicat

For most of us the feeling of being part of an important movement, the feeling of being a true frontrunner and first-mover, and the feeling of co-creating the rules of the future, and shaping the zeitgeist is rare. But occasionally something magical can happen, and you might, at least in a glimpse, get the sense of – collectively – hitting the wave right.

Yesterday at The Finance IT Day 2016 I had that feeling. What is happening at the moment in the financial technology industry globally is impressive. And as I watched the crowd of talented and ambitious people gathered in the main hall of Industriens Hus, I felt that Copenhagen actually has an opportunity of obtaining its fair share of the FinTech action going forward if the broad range of FinTech stakeholders manage to play it right together.

The FinTech vision

For the past year and a half, a group of public and private organizations, companies and authorities have worked hard “to make Copenhagen the leading FinTech hub in the Nordic region,” as Mayor Anna Mee Allerslev formulated the vision earlier this year. Several new projects have been started, and some of the results are a new and stronger version of CFIR by the name Copenhagen Fintech, the new FinTech co-working space Copenhagen Fintech Lab, Tryg’s InsurTech & Fintech co-working space The Camp, and Danske Bank’s The Hub.

The missing sandbox project

Although these are important projects for Copenhagen as a future FinTech hub, another highly important area – the regulatory treatment of the FinTech sector – still seems to lack the necessary attention from the Danish public authorities. Especially one thing seems to be in high demand amongst the regulated FinTech startups who want to operate in Denmark, and that is a kind regulatory sandbox like the one launched in May by the British Finance Conduct Authority (FCA).

FCA is the British counterpart to the Danish Finanstilsynet, and FCA was the first regulatory authority in the world to establish their sandbox as part of a comprehensive and progressive project called Project Innovate/The Innovation Hub. FCA’s Director of Strategy & Competition, Christopher Woolard, has described the overall project and the sandbox like this:

“The Innovation Hub was set up by the FCA to do two main things: Firstly, it provides direct support to innovative firms who are trying to launch new products into the market that we think might benefit consumers. And the second thing is that it is the center for our innovation policy “The regulatory sandbox” is where the government has asked us to look at if there is a way in which we can provide a safe space for firms to enter the market and experiment with some of the ideas that they may have.”

Especially one thing seems to be in high demand amongst the regulated FinTech startups who want to operate in Denmark, and that is a kind regulatory sandbox like the one launched in May by the British Finance Conduct Authority (FCA).

Several kinds of sandboxes

One of the main themes yesterday at the Finance IT Day was exactly the current need and potential for sandboxes in the FinTech sector.

Dea Markova, Head of Programmes at Innovate Finance, went through the British sandbox initiatives from FCA as mentioned above, and she underlined how these efforts in recent years had contributed heavily to the establishing of London as a leading global fintech hub.

According to Ernst & Young, the FinTech sector in the UK had a turnover of more than 6.6 billion pounds in 2015. The UK attracted FinTech investments for more than 520 million pounds the same year, and the UK FinTech sector employs more than 60.000 people. There is little doubt that the welcoming, open-minded and innovative attitude towards FinTech from the British FCA has its fair share of the credit for these impressing numbers (it is going to be interesting to see if and how much Brexit will slow down this progress).

According to Ernst & Young, the FinTech sector in the UK had a turnover of more than 6.6 billion pounds in 2015.

Since FCA established the first regulatory sandbox in the world in May this year, the idea has been copied by several other regulatory authorities throughout the world. At the moment you will find similar projects – in different stages – in places like France, Australia, Singapore, Thailand, Hong Kong, and Norway.

The industrial sandboxes

Dea Markova’s presentation yesterday was followed by a panel discussion about how to transfer the British sandbox ideas from the FCA into a Danish, Nordic or even cross-European context. In the panel – besides Dea Markova and myself – were people from Youlend, Spar Nord, Festina Lente, and Oslo Fintech.

I believe that everyone on the panel – and probably most of the couple of hundred people in the audience too – agreed that Denmark has a need for a regulatory sandbox if we want to realize the vision of positioning Copenhagen as a leading Nordic FinTech hub.

Unfortunately, the Danish FSA (Finanstilsynet) was not present in the panel or – I believe – at all at yesterday’s event, which was quite odd and obviously made it slightly difficult to send an immediate call for action to the regulator and the responsible minister.

Besides the regulatory sandbox, we need other kinds of industrial sandboxes that allow for startups to try out new solutions fast, easy and with no or little cost before they decide whether or not to take the next step.

The Signicat FinTech Starter Pack

In Signicat we have developed such an industrial sandbox within the area of identity. We call it the Signicat FinTech Starter Pack, and it is made for startups who need a safe test environment for identity features as part of their product or solution.

Ensuring compliance and staying on top of the regulation has a lot to do with handling identities and digital signing of legally binding contracts and documents. And the two disciplines are infrastructure services just like payments and preferably just a snippet of code or a plugin FinTech companies use when developing new business services or apps.

Some of the features that companies can test in the Signicat sandbox and that most financial apps need to deal with are:

• Onboarding new customers
• KYC (Know Your Customer)
• Accepting terms and conditions
• User consent

Signicat offers a full featured pre-production (test) environment for FinTech startups to explore and utilize. And when they are done testing it can all be deployed to Signicat’s production environment, if they choose so. Visit www.signicat.com/we-love-fintech and learn about how to get started.

Signicat launches FinTech Starter Pack

– Access to innovative electronic identity and signature solutions enables FinTech startups to immediately comply with KYC/AML regulations

Oslo, Norway 15th September 2016 – Signicat, the first and largest identity assurance provider in the world, today announced its FinTech Starter Pack to help new FinTech companies ensure immediate regulatory compliance. The package, specifically designed with the needs and budgets of FinTech companies in mind, will include access to Signicat’s Assure, Connect and Sign services, allowing startups comply with KYC and AML legislation, rapidly onboard customers, achieve increased sales and profitability and build customer trust.

“FinTech companies need to establish the trust that incumbents have built up over decades and part of that is ensuring that compliance systems are as robust as they possibly can be. But these companies can quickly find that developing this infrastructure themselves becomes a nightmare, draining time, resources, and affecting business outcomes.” said Gunnar Nordseth, CEO, Signicat.

Compliance is a very difficult issue to get around, and the fact that Signicat is offering its help through this initiative is a significant move within the industry.
Esben Bistrup Halvorsen, CEO & partner at Danish FinTech Lendino

“By providing customer on-boarding, KYC and document signing Signicat allows FinTech companies to take advantage of systems that have already undergone regulatory approval and are currently being used across the globe. We’re dedicated to innovating in the areas of electronic identity and signatures, and to offer customers solutions that enable them to offer their products and services in new and innovative ways. This starter pack is very much part of that.”

“With so many aspects of running a business to think about, assistance with the regulatory compliance process can provide a lifeline for a startup,” said Esben Bistrup Halvorsen, CEO & partner at Danish FinTech Lendino. “Compliance is a very difficult issue to get around, and the fact that Signicat is offering its help through this initiative is a significant move within the industry.”

“Signicat’s solutions are a core part of our crowdfunding offering, as they allow us to offer businesses and investors ways to organise cross-border funding rounds quickly and easily,” said Lasse Mäkelä, CEO at Finland-based Invesdor. “Partnering with Signicat for authentication services was a simple process, and has already led to dozens of successful funding rounds for our platform.”

Signicat specializes in cross border cloud based electronic identity services and electronic signatures. The FinTech Starter Pack includes access to the eID infrastructures in Denmark, Norway, Sweden and Finland, with more markets to follow, allowing companies to easily implement support for strong identification, transaction and document signing.

The Signicat FinTech Starter Pack includes:

  • Signicat cloud services for on-boarding, authentication and digital signing
  • Full access to crossborder eID testing and production environment
  • Maximum 500 transactions per month in testing and production environment
  • First month free of charge
  • Price is €149 per month thereafter

More information can be found at www.signicat.com/we-love-fintech

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About Signicat
Based in Trondheim, Norway, and founded in 2007, Signicat is the first and largest Identity Assurance Provider in the world, providing regulated markets with the technology to create mutual trust between organizations and their potential customers.

With Signicat, service providers can build and leverage existing customer credentials to connect users, devices and even ‘things’ across channels, services and markets transforming identity into an asset rather than an obstacle. By ditching manual, paper based processes and replacing them with digital identity assurance, customer on-boarding is accelerated and access to services is made simple and secure. Service providers can rapidly grow market share, easily acquire new customers, and ensure compliance with financial, privacy and data protection regulations including AML and KYC.

Signicat has the technology to connect the market, the expertise to scale the systems, and the experience to build the trust.

For more information, visit: www.signicat.com

Media Contacts
CCgroup for Signicat
signicat@ccgrouppr.com
+44 203 824 9200

Financial identity: Will the success of BankID in Norway ever be replicated elsewhere?

Norway’s banking onboarding system is admired and envied internationally – analysts and others who follow the development of banking technology worldwide point to Norway as an example to be emulated. One of these experts, Dave Birch of Consult Hyperion, said as much when he invited Signicat to participate in his regular Talking Transactions podcast. He also expressed frustration that it seemed unlikely that a version of BankID would be available in the UK any time soon.

We know from our research that people are unhappy with the process of applying for new financial products – so unhappy that many give in and simply abandon the process. In the UK, at least 40% of potential customers do this. In Norway, abandonment of this sort is much lower, thanks to BankID.

BankID allows banks to authenticate and conclude agreements with individuals digitally. 3.5m Norwegians have a BankID, and the system is used by all of the country’s banks. If you want to sign up for a new financial product there’s no need to go through the laborious process of inputting your detailed personal information each time. Instead, your BankID gives the bank all of the necessary information. BankID also allows banks to authenticate and conclude agreements with individuals digitally. With this system, it’s far simpler to sign up for financial services using just a social security number and mobile device – and no need to start each application process from scratch. BankIDs are used for many more applications than just retail bank accounts – insurance, secure post, age verification and student housing all now use BankID.

There are a handful of countries using similar schemes, but generally, when compared with Norway, the onboarding process is slow and uses anachronistic paper-based processes to confirm identity. So can other countries learn from the success of BankID and implement similar programs? Or is Dave Birch correct to assume that we’re unlikely to see the system replicated elsewhere?

The problem is that banks and other financial services providers are, as individual entities, looking at how to improve the user experience of their applications processes. They are asking questions such as how to guide their customer through the form, how to make the inputting of information easier, and how to tempt applicants who have abandoned their application to complete it.

All of this is important, but in order to create a BankID-like experience, the real question should be: how can the entire financial sector cooperate – potentially with governments and mobile operators – to create an identity process that is simple and universal?

There are services are going some way to do some of the work that a national ID system would do. For example, the UK’s Current Account Switch Service makes transferring a current account much simpler. However, it can’t be extended for, say, insurance products or other applications such as secure post or government services.
A system like Norway’s BankID cannot be created piecemeal by banks working separately. It requires a collaboration and creation process similar to the one that created BankID.

BankID started as a collaboration between the two organisations that merged to become Finans Norge, the trade body for the financial industry in Norway and now representing more than 200 financial service providers. As the system was borne out of a collaboration between banks and a third party, there was no risk that one single bank would own the identity process.

The key to a universally-adopted identity system is collaboration. Without this collaboration, banks will be unwilling to adopt systems created and owned by rival banks, and innovation will remain uneven throughout the industry. Only with a collaborative approach, led by an industry body trusted by all, it is possible to build an ID system that all financial service providers will buy into and will be trusted by consumers.

Invesdor and Signicat create history with InsurTech equity crowdfunding offering

  • Crowdfunding round for Cloud Solutions raises almost double target
  • Cross-border authentication of investors was key to success

Oslo, Norway 25th August 2016
Norwegian FinTech company, Cloud Solutions which develops Cloud Insurance a software-as-a-service for the insurance industry, has become the first ever Norwegian equity crowdfunding success using Finland-based Invesdor’s crowdfunding platform. Cloud Solutions saw its equity offering oversubscribed, raising almost twice its original target.

The success of the equity offering hinged on opening up access to investors across the Nordics. This was made possible by another Norwegian company, Signicat, the first and largest identity assurance provider in the world. Organizations typically use Signicat’s services for customer on-boarding and authentication as well as digital signatures.

In order to participate, equity crowdfunding legislation stipulates that investors are subjected to know your customer (KYC) verification, among other checks, including the submission of physical documentation such as passports. This creates a challenge for companies looking to raise funds from investors in multiple markets.

Invesdor’s partnership with Signicat meant that Norwegian, Swedish, Danish and Finnish investors could participate in the funding round using eIDs such as BankID, NemID, banking credentials and mobile certificates issued in each country.

“The result speaks for itself: oversubscription and an investor group that matches our company very well,” said Axel Sjøstedt, CEO at Cloud Solutions.

“We want to offer businesses and investors a user-friendly and secure service for organizing cross-border funding rounds easily, and authenticating investors and entrepreneurs is a big part of that,” said Lasse Mäkelä, CEO at Invesdor. “However, authentication services are not our core business, so we wanted an experienced partner who could offer authentication services that investors in our target markets are familiar with. Signicat worked well for Cloud Solutions’ equity offering, as it has for dozens of other funding rounds on our platform.”

“With over $34bn raised globally through crowdfunding last year alone it is clear that asking a large number of people for a small amount of money is here to stay. As the market matures companies are looking to open up access to investors from around the world to secure the best valuation and the best investors to meet their ambitions. Historically this has been largely prohibited by KYC regulation, until now,” said Antti Harsunen, Signicat Country Manager for Finland. “By allowing investors from other markets to use their existing eIDs, crowdfunding platforms can be truly global, boosting value for all those involved. The success of Cloud Solutions with Invesdor is a testament to its potential.”

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Signicat featured on Tomorrow’s Transactions

At the Trust in the Digital World (TDW) conference in June, John Erik Setsaas, Identity Architect at Signicat sat down for a chat with Dave Birch of Consult Hyperion – a man just as obsessed with identity as we are, and the author of Identity is the New Money.

The discussion was recorded and has now been released as part of Consult Hyperion’s Tomorrow’s Transactions podcast:
Click here to hear the podcast (www.chyp.com/podcasts/john-setsaas-signicat/)

The podcast is just over fifteen minutes long and is part of an ongoing series where Dave Birch interviews thought leaders in financial technology.

Click the link above to hear John Erik and Dave discuss Signicat’s heritage and future, the “Scandinavian way of doing things” with ID, and whether the cooperation necessary to create Norway’s Bank ID can be replicated elsewhere in Europe.

Is Digital ID the Key to Turning the Tide on Costly and Ineffectual AML Regulation?

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CEO Signicat, Gunnar Nordseth

Gunnar Nordseth has more than 20 years of experience with information security, PKI and digital identity, and has since 2006 been CEO of Signicat.

Money laundering is a global problem, big enough that the World Bank conservatively estimates money laundering activity to be 2% of global GDP – that’s $1.5 trillion. No city is untainted, but London has been dubbed the money laundering capital of the world, despite attempts to crack down.

So how do regulatory bodies tackle this huge issue? The cost of implementing anti-money laundering (AML) regulation is already staggering. In 2003 the combined cost of AML in Europe and the USA was already $5 billion. Now it’s at least $7 billion in the USA alone.

And what do we get for this investment? According to a University of Chicago report, not very much – their estimate, described as ‘generous’, was that only 0.2% of money attempted to be cleaned is seized – for every dollar caught by AML regulation, $499 is successfully laundered.

In 2003 the combined cost of AML in Europe and the USA was already $5 billion. Now it’s at least $7 billion in the USA alone.

Despite the rising costs to meet compliance, the rules are proving increasingly difficult to implement. Fines for failing to meet the rules are breaking records: for example, last year HSBC was fined £28 million by Swiss authorities, and Barclays fined £72 million by UK authorities.

Is AML regulation broken?

It’s very easy to reach the conclusion that AML regulation – and the ‘know Your customer’ (KYC) procedures used by financial institutions to meet these regulations – just aren’t good enough. More must be done.

But the rules, ineffective as they might seem, already have unintended effects beyond what they set out to achieve. Thanks to AML rules, a Somali expatriate living in the US will find it completely impossible to send money home – banks just aren’t willing to take on the liability of sending money to certain countries where money laundering is seen as a risk.

This isn’t the only example of AML rules hampering commercial activity in the developing world. Mauritius has 25 government officials working on implementing money laundering legislation. That might not seem like too many – but it is in fact more than the number of opticians in the country.

Analysts and trade bodies are also unhappy with the current regime. Ecommerce Europe claims that KYC procedures are long and burdensome for the consumer and have a negative effect for the e-commerce sector. Dave Birch of Consult Hyperion has described current AML rules as “fatally flawed”.

It seems pretty clear – AML regulation is broken. The rules place onerous demands on those who have to implement them, and are seemingly ineffective.

It seems pretty clear – AML regulation is broken. The rules place onerous demands on those who have to implement them, and are seemingly ineffective.

Not so fast

AML regulation does have its defenders. The regulatory authorities are, understandably, more positive about the regulations – they describe them as “clear, strict and enforceable”.

There is also a good argument for AML regulation being not just necessary, but increasingly necessary. Criminals are increasingly sophisticated in their money laundering methods, and legislation needs to evolve to reflect that.

What would it mean to relax AML rules? One of the biggest drivers behind AML legislation in recent years has been the prevention of funding terrorism. Terrorism is, compared with other crimes where laundering is necessary, relatively cheap and uses smaller amounts of money. Relaxing current rules is likely to mean missing this sort of suspicious activity altogether.

New EU legislation on money laundering is already on the way: EU member states will need to maintain central registers listing information on the ultimate beneficial owners of corporate and other legal entities. The aim is to have greater transparency in financial transactions.

Pleas to relax regulation are unlikely to be heard. If anything, regulation is going to get stricter and financial institutions will be more responsible for the transactions they undertake.

What’s the solution?

The solution to making AML regulation work is not by making it stricter, nor by relaxing it. Instead, KYC checks need to be smarter.

Financial institutions are increasingly digital businesses and interact with their customers through digital channels. The ID required for KYC checks are, however, paper based. These checks have to be repeated each time KYC checks need to be done, whether that party is known to the institution or not. This makes identity impossibly complex and needlessly expensive. Systems are also fragmented by national and corporate boundaries.

What’s needed is a system which re-uses credentials that have already passed KYC checks. The major issue is the authentication and ongoing use of fraudulent ID. Using existing credentials would eliminate this, allowing fraud teams within financial institutions to focus on those customers who lack credentials. This would be particularly effective for high-risk cross border transactions – transactions like those to Somalia that many banks simply refuse.

In addition, a federated model of identity that connects financial institutions to a range of existing public and private ID systems would mean faster and easier KYC. Making KYC simpler makes regulations less onerous, and AML more effective without adding more and more rules. The re-use of identity also allows simplification of legitimate economic migration. For example, a verified UK identity could easily be transferred to any other country, doing away with the painful, counter-productive system currently in place.

The solution lies in fundamentally changing how identity is checked, and creating a system that is more in keeping with the increased use and reliance on online, digital channels.

There is no regulatory solution to the problems of money laundering – increasing fines has just meant banks get fined more, and more legislation has just meant more pain and more cost for those implementing KYC procedures without recovering more laundered money. The solution lies in fundamentally changing how identity is checked, and creating a system that is more in keeping with the increased use and reliance on online, digital channels. In this interconnected, digital world we need to move beyond forms of identity that are rooted in local jurisdictions.

This article was published at www.financemagnates.com: Click here to read the article (www.financemagnates.com)

Free webinar about on-boarding new customers

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Have you read the recent whitepaper on «The battle to on-board» from Signicat? If not, you can get your copy by clicking here.

We have scheduled a webinar (45 minutes) on June 22, 2016 at 3:00 PM CEST (UTC+2:00) to discuss the challenges in more detail, and provide the vision for Knowing Your Customers in the future. The webinar is being held by John Erik Setsaas – Senior Development Architect at Signicat.

First MyBank Identity Verification Pilot showcased at EBAday

Today at EBAday in Milan, two participants in the MyBank Identity Verification Pilot showcased how a consumer can digitally agree to a contract using an authentication service provided by their bank.

The transaction was completed between Signicat, a digital identity service provider for banks in the Nordics and elsewhere, and CWBI, the main gateway for a number of financial institutions participating in MyBank.

The showcasing of this transaction came as part of the ongoing MyBank Identity Verification Pilot program, which started at the beginning of the year. Since then, a working group composed of banks and service providers together with merchants and public authorities has provided feedback on the functionality and specifications created for the new MyBank Identity Verification solution. With MyBank Identity Verification, consumers can confirm online – through a service offered by their bank – for instance their age, their identity or that they wish to enter into a contract. The aim is to show how customer data held by an Account Servicing Payment Service Provider can be used to safely speed up the authentication, customer due diligence or paperwork that might be required for certain online services. These steps often take days, if not weeks to be completed, and lead to extra costs and administrative burden.

MyBank Identity Verification is an example of ‘Open Banking’, a concept that enables financial institutions to use the data they store for their customers to create additional services
Giorgio Ferrero, CEO of PRETA

Giorgio Ferrero, CEO of PRETA, said “MyBank Identity Verification is an example of ‘Open Banking’, a concept that enables financial institutions to use the data they store for their customers to create additional services, going beyond simply providing payment services. As financial institutions are required to open their accounts through new regulation such as PSD2, it also shows how they can offer their customers new value-added services.”

Arne Vidar Haug, Co-founder of Signicat, said “MyBank Identity Verification will help to bridge the gap between millions of users and online services in Europe. By digitally connecting consumers and businesses, MyBank Identity Verification is making it easy for consumers to digitally register, apply for services and sign contracts. For businesses, the solution enables regulated businesses to attract more customers online and provide great user experiences for customers.”

MyBank Identity Verification will help to bridge the gap between millions of users and online services in Europe
Arne Vidar Haug, Co-founder of Signicat

Roberto Martina, CEO of CWBI, said “MyBank Identity Verification is a great opportunity for PSPs to play an important role in the digital identity verification process. MyBank Identity Verification is the easiest way for consumers and businesses to confirm their identity through their online account in order to complete online purchases or subscribe to digital services, in a safe and trusted manner.”

MyBank is an e-authorisation solution for the exchange of financial and non-financial information. The solution currently supports online banking-based payments via SEPA Credit Transfer as well as the creation, amendment and cancellation of SEPA Direct Debit mandates and will soon also support Identity Verification services. Since its launch, goods and services worth more than EUR 1 billion have been paid for with MyBank SEPA Credit Transfer (SCT).


Press contact
Annick Moes. Tel: +49 151 1631 1526 (a.moes@ebaclearing.eu)

MyBank
MyBank (www.mybank.eu) is an e-authorisation solution that enables customers to pay for their online purchases via their regular online or mobile banking environment. The solution is open to all authorised payment service providers (PSPs) in the Single Euro Payments Area (SEPA), including, without limitation, credit institutions and payment institutions.

Customers using MyBank do not have to communicate their payment details or personal credentials to any third parties, since the payment initiation, mandate creation or transaction validation process takes place within the highly secured environment of their own bank. Public administration agencies and e-businesses using MyBank are informed in real time when a customer has initiated a payment.

As a pan-European e-authorisation solution, MyBank is also well-positioned to be used for transactions in other currencies or for e-identity services. MyBank is owned and managed by PRETA S.A.S., a wholly owned subsidiary of EBA CLEARING, a provider of pan-European payment solutions.

Follow MyBank on twitter (https://twitter.com/MyBankPayments) or LinkedIn (www.linkedin.com/company/mybank.) to keep up-to-date with the latest news.

Signicat
Based in Trondheim, Norway, Signicat (www.signicat.com) is the first and largest Identity Assurance Provider in the world, providing regulated markets with the technology to create mutual trust between organizations and their potential customers.

With Signicat, service providers can leverage existing customer credentials to connect users, devices and even ‘things’ across channels, services and markets transforming identity into an asset rather than an obstacle. By ditching manual, paper based processes and replacing them with digital identity assurance, customer on-boarding is accelerated and access to services is made simple and secure. Service providers can rapidly grow market share, easily acquire new customers, and ensure compliance with financial, privacy and data protection regulations including AML and KYC.

CWBI – Codice Web Banking Innovation
Based in Padua, Italy, CWBI offers software solutions for the banking industry as well as IT consulting and software development, with strong skills in areas such as banking, insurance, media and publishing.

As an accredited MyBank System Integrator, CWBI has developed the “MyBank Platform”, a modular product offering the full range of features that allow banks to be easily activated for the use of MyBank services.

CWBI continuously focuses on improving its customer solutions through new technologies with a focus on mobile solutions. It has established strong business relationships with Italian companies of national strategic importance.

For more information about CWBI, please visit: www.cwbi.it

Money 20/20 Europe and the battle to onboard

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The first few month of 2016 have been busy for Signicat, culminating in several exciting announcements and developments at Money 20/20 Europe. The event, which took place in Copenhagen in April, is a new spin-off from the successful Las Vegas event, and was very well attended by financial technology innovators. This made it the perfect place to launch our unique research into bank onboarding.

The battle to on-board

Traditional banks’ dominant position in the value chain is under threat. They are involved in a growing battle for consumers’ business, driven by an increasing amount of competition from challengers, new fintech players, and each other. Many are investing in digital transformation with the aim of both increasing customer engagement through convenience and simplicity, and reducing costs.

In this effort to digitise, one area that is consistently overlooked is the beginning of the customer journey: on-boarding. Under current regulatory schemes, on-boarding is complex and painful. Banks must comply with Know Your Customer (KYC) and Anti Money Laundering (AML) requirements, which necessitate the physical presentation of personal information and several proofs of identity.

While much of the on-boarding process can be completed online, throughout the majority of Europe customers must present original proofs of identity either in person at a branch, or via the post along with reams of personal information. This extends an already lengthy set-up process.

On-boarding is one of the last strongholds for antiquated paper processes for an industry hell-bent on being digital. This must be addressed if banks are going to remain competitive, let alone retail their place in the value chain.

Moving from analog to digital

In order to understand consumers attitudes to current on-boarding processes, Signicat surveyed 2,000 bank account holders and analyzed their responses in a report entitled “The Battle to On-Board”.

The research found that the onboarding process led to many potential customers abandoning their applications, either because it took too long (39%) or because too much personal information was required (34%). Both retail banks and fintech providers need to put a lot of time and effort into attracting customers, so they need to know that onboarding is the weak link in the chain – 40% of potential applicants are abandoning the process at this vital step.

Fundamentally, the report found that consumers want to move to purely digital on-boarding where they can verify their identity online without the hassle involved in presenting a physical form of ID to the bank.

A federated ID model

The major barrier to a 100% online application process is identity verification but the need for customers to go into the branch is, from the report, doing more harm than good. Customers find the in-branch experience is hugely frustrating, with almost three out of every four customers unhappy with the service.

While ID scanning can help, it makes more sense for customers to provide digital versions of their existing ID credentials – passport, driving license, utility bill, etc. – to banks in order to verify their identity and accelerate KYC. Our research found that 97% of people have documentation that could form the basis of a digital ID – a passport, driving license or a similar form of identity. By making it possible to create and use digital IDs, banks will be able to on-board customers far more quickly and completely online.

If banks continue to make it difficult for consumers to apply for services, they will simply stop applying.

SDC works closely with Signicat to deliver cross border eID digital signing services to more than 120 banks

Company’s cloud-based next-generation solution selected by SDC to support cross border eID digital signing services in Scandinavia

Copenhagen, Denmark, 4th April, 2016: Signicat, the first and largest identity assurance provider in the world, today announced it will be working closely with SDC, to provide its clients with next generation cross-border eID digital signing services. SDC provides financial technology including system operation and data processing for more than 120 banks in Denmark, Norway, Sweden and Faroe Islands.

Signicat will enable SDC’s bank customers in multiple markets to quickly, simply and securely sign documents with public eIDs from Scandinavia.

SDC will integrate Signicat’s cloud-based cross border eID digital signing services into its application platform, providing access and full support for national eID and digital signing systems in Scandinavia, including BankID, NemID and Mobile ID. The service will be white labelled to SDC’s banking clients’ business and retail customers.

Since 1963 SDC has pioneered the development, delivery and maintainence of online financial systems from cards and payments to funds, issues and deposits to pensions for leading Scandanvian banks. Recently SDC has elected to work with a handful of leading suppliers with proven technology that compliments its wider product portfolio and can add significant value for its clients. Signicat was selected as its preferred supplier in a competitive tender, with the company’s flexibility, scalability and reference list proving a deciding factor.

In particular, our banking clients are seeing significant interest in digital signing services that take the pain out of manual, paper based processes.
Nikolaj Andersen, Head of R&D Digitalization at SDC

“Business and consumers are demanding digital financial services, often self-service, that can be accessed online and on the move. In particular, our banking clients are seeing significant interest in digital signing services that take the pain out of manual, paper based processes. Correspondingly banks require digital signing services that can be implemented rapidly, handle the complexities of cross-border from both a technological and regulatory perspective, and scale to potentially millions of users,” said Nikolaj Andersen, Head of R&D Digitalization at SDC.

As the first and largest digital identity assurance provider with vast experience in the Nordic markets and access to 17 eID providers globally with a reach of 81.2m customer ID credentials, Signicat was the best choice.

The starting point for any customer journey is ID verification and access. And it is critical that a digital relationship is built from the outset that doesn’t rely on manual, paper based processes.
Gunnar Nordseth, Signicat CEO

“Banks are coming under increasing pressure to provide digital services as they compete with new market entrants unshackled by antiquated legacy systems. The starting point for any customer journey is ID verification and access. And it is critical that a digital relationship is built from the outset that doesn’t rely on manual, paper based processes,” said Gunnar Nordseth, Signicat CEO.

“SDC was one of the innovators in digital signing. Our work with SDC will build on its leadership to ensure that its bank clients can offer their customers a simple and secure experience when signing, uncomplicated by long forms and lengthy ID checks. As SDC is one of the biggest players in the Nordic fintech market there’s enormous scope to help financial institutions in their transition to digital-first organisations.”


About Signicat

Based in Trondheim, Norway, and founded in 2007, Signicat is the first and largest Identity Assurance Provider in the world, providing regulated markets with the technology to create mutual trust between organizations and their potential customers.

With Signicat, service providers can build and leverage existing customer credentials to connect users, devices and even ‘things’ across channels, services and markets transforming identity into an asset rather than an obstacle. By ditching manual, paper based processes and replacing them with digital identity assurance, customer on-boarding is accelerated and access to services is made simple and secure. Service providers can rapidly grow market share, easily acquire new customers, and ensure compliance with financial, privacy and data protection regulations including AML and KYC.

Signicat has the technology to connect the market, the expertise to scale the systems, and the experience to build the trust.

About SDC

SDC is an IT-centre providing an all-round service for financial institutions in Scandinavia. Our clientele is made up of over 124 Danish, Norwegian, Swedish and Faroese financial institutions, which are also the owners of SDC.

SDC is based on the philosophy of common solutions for common needs – and the cost saving benefits which go with it. SDC´s services are supplied at cost price to the owning institutions.

SDC´s core business is the development, maintenance, operation and joint purchase of IT solutions for the financial sector. SDC´s services are provided by SDC itself or SDC’s partners in cooperation and sub-suppliers.

Media Contacts

CCgroup for Signicat
signicat@ccgrouppr.com
+44 203 824 9200

bitcoin

Will the 4th AML directive be a blessing or a blow for Bitcoin?

bitcoin

The European Commission (EC) wants to update the fourth Anti-Money Laundering directive so that it also covers virtual currencies, such as Bitcoin. This isn’t surprising.

Virtual currencies are primarily used for benign purposes, but they’ve yet to throw off their shady reputation. Silk Road meant that it’s connected in most people’s minds with drugs, and the EC wants to regulate these currencies in order to “prevent their abuse for money laundering and terrorist financing purposes”.

Specifically the EC is proposing “to bring virtual currency exchange platforms under the scope of the Anti-Money Laundering Directive, so that these platforms have to apply customer due diligence controls when exchanging virtual for real currencies, ending the anonymity associated with such exchanges.”

It’s unusual for more legislation to be good news, especially with cryptocurrencies, but there’s a chance this could be the making of Bitcoin. If it’s no longer anonymous, it might be able to shake off its bad reputation. Virtual currencies can ‘go legit’.

Regulatory repercussions

But it may have negative repercussions elsewhere. There are numerous small fintech players who are using either Bitcoin or the technology behind Bitcoin – the blockchain – as a fundamental part of their offering. These relatively small companies will have to take on the Know Your Customer (KYC) and Anti-Money Laundering (AML) compliance burden. They tend to be VC-funded and not yet profitable, which would make this a tough ask. Plus they would be liable to fines if they get it wrong – fines that have been increasing exponentially.

These relatively small companies will have to take on the Know Your Customer (KYC) and Anti-Money Laundering (AML) compliance burden.

We’ve already seen the impact of non-compliance in the cases of Plus500 and more recently Dwolla in regards to protecting customer information. And these are large, well-established organisations.

The majority of fintech start-ups can breathe a sigh of relief however, as the regulation doesn’t apply to them – yet.

Only exchanges…for now

The proposed amendment actually only applies to a small segment of the bitcoin industry: exchanges.

Wallets and other firms not involved in the exchange of Bitcoin to fiat are excluded. Most European Bitcoin exchanges are already doing risk based Customer Due Diligence. This is likely the main reason there has not been complaints from the European virtual currency exchanges.

Given prepaid cards are under scope and according to the EC “there seems to be a risk that virtual currencies may be used by terrorist organizations to conceal financial transactions” the direction of travel is clear. Bitcoin’s anonymity is under threat.

The end of anonymity?

Regulation is often accused of stifling innovation but this may have the opposite effect.

Bitcoin isn’t really used, it’s hoarded, with a number of individuals controlling vast quantities of the currency. In fact the spread of wealth for Bitcoin is even more unevenly distributed than fiat currencies with 0.003% of Bitcoin ‘holders’ controlling 30% of the currency. The recent turbulence in the financial markets has exacerbated the issue as investors store wealth in Bitcoin as a safe haven like gold.

Consumers have to go through a KYC process to gain a bank account or prepaid card to make payments, meaning merchants can trust they aren’t dealing with fraudsters or money launderers. With Bitcoin there are no such assurances.

Addressing the issue of anonymity is essential if it is ever going to have the utility of traditional fiat currency. Acceptance by organisations, especially merchants, is tied to KYC/AML compliance. Consumers have to go through a KYC process to gain a bank account or prepaid card to make payments, meaning merchants can trust they aren’t dealing with fraudsters or money launderers. With Bitcoin there are no such assurances.

But while introducing KYC requirements for Bitcoin might seem a no-brainer, it’s not. Part of the attraction of Bitcoin is its anonymity. Other than cash it is one of the only widely used forms of payment that is anonymous. It is the only form that is electronic.

Translucent ID

So now the question is, is it possible to reconcile the regulatory push for Bitcoin legitimacy with the preferences of its anonymous users?

The answer might lie with the blockchain itself: a distributed ledger would enable identity to be built up based on individual ID credentials – their driving license, bank account, government ID, and so on.

Using the blockchain it is possible to construct a ‘translucent’ ID system in such a way as to partition knowledge of identities. The blockchain would in effect maintain a record of various ID credentials for an individual and act as a trusted pseudonym for someone’s identity. The partition element would involve a third party who would hold the ID credentials as a kind of escrow. The details of these credentials – the real identity – would only ever be released under prescribed, specific circumstances.

Identity would effectively be ‘tokenized’.

So while the Bitcoin operator might not know who owns a particular wallet (for example) it would know for sure that another regulated institution does and, more importantly, that regulators can find out if needs be.

Blockchain: identity revolution or evolution?

gunnar nordseth signicat

CEO Signicat, Gunnar Nordseth

Gunnar Nordseth has more than 20 years of experience with information security, PKI and digital identity, and has since 2006 been CEO of Signicat.

The blockchain: more than just transactions

“Bitcoin” and “the blockchain” are often seen as synonymous. But while Bitcoin has given us new meanings to money and mediums of exchange, it is the underlying technology, the blockchain, that may be one of the most important inventions of our time.

The blockchain holds a record of transactions with theoretically unlimited amounts of valued assets through its publicly distributed ledger, and this public distribution means this data is effectively is unforgeable. This gives it real-world implications – a recent report estimated that the technology could cut banks’ infrastructure costs for cross-border payments, securities trading and regulatory compliance by $15bn-$20bn a year from 2022.

Broad_chain_closeup

What’s less talked about is the potential for the blockchain to revolutionize the way we think about identity.

The blockchain is often thought of as a way to record transactions, but it has other uses. It’s been touted as the perfect solution to many of the financial services industry’s problems, from capital markets to retail banking to payments. What’s less talked about is the potential for the blockchain to revolutionize the way we think about identity.

A financial identity crisis

Identity has been a tricky problem ever since we found it necessary to distinguish between friend and foe. Currently there are millions of disenfranchised individuals who cannot prove who they are to organisations. There are also millions worldwide who have forged identity documentation and may not be who they say they are. Financial institutions must, by law, be strict enough to catch those who have forged or stolen identities – a process that disenfranchises those who struggle to identify themselves.

Financial institutions must, by law, be strict enough to catch those who have forged or stolen identities – a process that disenfranchises those who struggle to identify themselves.

Even if you are able to prove who you are, the processes to do so are built on paper-based systems. This is increasingly incongruous with our digital lives. We’re now so used to signing up to online services that having to stop and deal with paper seems like a step back into another world, like swapping a Prius for a penny-farthing.

The Know Your Customer (KYC) processes that financial institutions must put in place are there to stop criminals from easily funding illegal activity – drugs and terrorism are the reasons usually cited. But even with the vast amount spent on KYC processes and technology, money laundering is not declining. According to Cifas, the UK’s fraud prevention bureau, the number of bank accounts opened using stolen or fictitious identities actually doubled last year.

Costs are up, identity crime is up, and fines are also on the increase. Barclays was recently fined over $100m+ for customer due diligence (CDD) failures. Current KYC processes are broken.

How can the blockchain help solve this?

A distributed ledger would enable identity to be built up of individual uses of a person’s identity, be totally unforgeable and increase speed and ease of use for services. And an infallible ID system would mean a far better level of trust and convenience for both consumers and financial organisations.

Making this happen isn’t a quick or easy task. One way to get started would be for various global regions to begin issuing digitally authenticated birth certificates. Birth certificates and identities verified on the block chain would be unforgeable, time stamped, and publicly viewed for everyone to see.

The blockchain distributed ledger is strengthened any time some kind of identity evidence is presented. Open a bank account – that’s a link in the chain. Take out a mortgage – another link in the chain. A Facebook profile – another link. And so on: voter registration, driving licence, utility bills, and credit cards would all add links in the chain.

The more touch points where identity is presented that go in to proving the identity, the more secure it is. Building identity in this way means that everything you do is interconnected and because of its distributed nature, it’s almost impossible to defraud. Financial institutions can be sure of who their customers are thanks to this ledger, and criminal activity more easily traced by seeing where funds are going.

Blockchain

Revolution or evolution?

It’s hard to overstate the impact the blockchain could have on financial identity. Currently it’s possible for a regulated financial institution to make a payment to an unknown person. This would be consigned to the database of history.

It would also be possible to construct a ‘translucent’ blockchain system. Here the trading bank might not know who owns a particular wallet or account, but it would know for sure that another regulated financial institution does. An audit trail exists and regulators can find out if necessary.

Critical to success is making this system easy to use. This “distributed identity system” needs to be part of an easy to use scheme with straightforward adoption – otherwise no one will take it on.

The blockchain is not a complete replacement for current systems. It needs to be integrated into other technologies, and the information, or transactions, that are to be stored in the blockchain need to come from somewhere. It’s important not to see it as a magic solution – identity still needs to come from somewhere.

If the blockchain is implemented correctly into KYC systems, it has the potential to make identity fraud and identity frustration a thing of the past

There is also the issue of blockchain fragmentation. There will be no single blockchain, but multitude. The requirement from financial institutions will be which blockchains to trust, and how they can integrate existing ID systems into this new structure. If this technology is to gain acceptance, then this is potentially the biggest issue that will have to be overcome.

If the blockchain is implemented correctly into KYC systems, it has the potential to make identity fraud and identity frustration a thing of the past – as well as drastically reducing the costs to financial institutions and eliminating the crippling fines they face.

Regulation creates opportunities

A year in review and the year ahead – thoughts on the eID market in 2015 and 2016

2015 was a great year for Signicat with many new exciting solutions delivered to our customers and significant improvements done to many of our existing products. To summarize what has happened in 2015 we asked Gunnar Nordseth, CEO at Signicat a couple of questions.

gunnar nordseth signicat

CEO Signicat, Gunnar Nordseth

Gunnar Nordseth has more than 20 years of experience with information security, PKI and digital identity, and has since 2006 been CEO of Signicat. Signicat, winner of the 2009 IDDY award from Kantara Initiative, was co-founded by Gunnar in 2006. Gunnar has a master’s degree in numerical mathematics from the Norwegian Institute of Technology.

The eID market is constantly evolving – what happened in the eID market in 2015?

The Nordic countries have been pioneers in the use of electronic identity for digital onboarding, but we are starting to see that the rest of Europe is following suit.

The new European regulation on electronic identity and trust services (eIDAS) which was approved in 2014, will contribute to driving acceptance and interoperability of eID and eSignature in the European market.

Countries like Germany and Spain continue to deploy their national infrastructure for electronic ID, while Estonia and Belgium have made considerable progress in deploying a national eID infrastructure while offering services to the public that ensures they are being used. The new European regulation on electronic identity and trust services (eIDAS) which was approved in 2014, will contribute to driving acceptance and interoperability of eID and eSignature in the European market.

Equally interesting is the ongoing establishment of cross-industry schemes and federations for eID. These are established by banks, telecommunications companies and others who want to exploit the network effect of providing electronic identity across industries and businesses.

One such example is the recently announced partnership between Dutch banks and the payment association in Netherlands to establish a federation of electronic identity which is called iDIN, another is MyBank which is a pan European initiative by PRETA S.A.S. The telco industry has also developed their own eID scheme through GSMA which is called Mobile Connect.

Bank federation Mybank
Telecom federation Mobile Connect

The common denominator of these initiatives is that they connect existing electronic identity together in federations. Thus, a customer of a Dutch bank can use his online banking login to establish a customer relationship with an ecommerce retailer.

Initiatives like the Dutch interbank login and MyBank has the potential for rapid deployment of digital onboarding. They build on existing electronic identity that already is in frequent use for Internet banking, sidestepping the need for costly and time-consuming deployment of new electronic identity.

Signicat opened a new office in the Netherlands in 2015, can you elaborate on why you made that decision?

Amsterdam is a natural location for the first Signicat office outside of the Nordic region for several reasons. Home to some of the world’s largest financial institutions, Amsterdam is also a communications hub with easy access to the financial and commercial centres of Continental Europe.

Adding to this, the Netherlands is a mature market for eID, with emerging eID solutions in both the public and private sectors. It is also an advanced market with high acceptance of doing business online.

One additional argument for the Amsterdam office is that Signicat is already involved in activities in the Dutch market, with several of its existing Nordic customers looking to expand the use of eID services from Signicat into this market. Therefore, you can say that establishing the Dutch office was a natural next step in the process of establishing Signicat as a player in the European eID market.

Adding to this, the Netherlands is a mature market for eID, with emerging eID solutions in both the public and private sectors. It is also an advanced market with high acceptance of doing business online.

Were there any milestones reached by Signicat at 2015?

The two main goals for Signicat in 2015 were:

1. Keep on growing in existing markets
2. Expand business into new markets

I think we can say we have made good on both accounts. Revenue growth will end on about 30% up from 2014. The other goal, to expand business into new markets, was achieved in two steps: When we established the first office outside of the Nordic region, in Amsterdam in September, and when we signed up the first customer for the Netherlands in November.

Behind the numbers, there is also an impressive series of ”wins” both in the Nordic market and in other European markets. We have strengthened our position as a leader in the Nordic region, by adding new customers, by adding new services to existing customers, in addition to setting up strategic partnerships with new partners.

What new solutions did Signicat develop in 2015 and what where your main focus?

A lot of effort has been put into new products in 2015. The majority of this has been geared towards expanding the geographical reach and coverage of our eID platform. We are now positioned for expanding into new European markets with a highly advanced portfolio of products for identity proofing and strong authentication. Other highlights of the year are enhanced products for e-signature, trusted time stamp services and longtime preservation of signed documents.

What is your outlook on the eID space in 2016? Any trends, challenges, technologies or opportunities you would like to point out?

Trust and digital identity is a prerequisite for cross-border transactions. Without trust and digital identity, the growth potential will be limited. Merchants who want to do cross-border commerce must know their customers, and the only realistic way to do this is through the use of electronic identity.

The best solution is to outsource the complexity of identification and authentication to specialists like Signicat, just as the merchants did with payments. Identity providers not only specialize in protecting customers from identity theft, but also allow customers to re-use their existing IDs and credentials, preventing the build-up of a ‘digital key chain’.

Signicat attending eSignRecords in New York

Signicat is attending the eSignRecords conference in New York, between the 17th and the 18th of November. Signicat, represented by Arne Vidar Haug, will be participating as a part of the Global Identity Management panel, sharing insight and experiences from being the leading digital identity hub and provider of electronic signature services in Europe. Also attending the panel is representatives from DocuSign, Locke Lord, CBC Numérique, and IOCS.

Signicat will, amongst other things, talk about how it is bridging the various electronic identity platforms, schemes and solutions in Europe – making it easy for American players to stay regulatory compliant in Europe and expand digitally into European countries.

More information about the event can be found here: www.americanbanker.com

Press release – Simplifying digital agreements in Norway

Director of Digipost in Norway Post, Thomas Mathisen (left) and director of business development at Signicat, Arne Vidar Haug. Photo: Norway Post/Birker Morken.

Norway Post establishes electronic signature services, which will simplify digital signing of any kind of agreement or contract. The solution is chosen by the Norwegian government, but can be used for any type of contract or agreement that needs a signature in both the private and the public sector.

“There are still way too many areas where citizens still depend on paper and pen for agreements”, says Thomas Mathisen, director of Digipost in Norway Post. “A simple solution is needed, which can be used for any type of contract, for example selling a car, renting an apartment or taking up a loan, as well as confirming a place in kindergarten or school. The solution can be integrated with Digipost, which is the digital mailbox for all Norwegian citizens, so that each party can store their own copy of the signed agreement. There are multiple solutions for electronic signatures, but most of these are niche solutions for various industries. Norway Post has seen the need for a national solution for digital agreements,” says Mathisen.

There are multiple solutions for electronic signatures, but most of these are niche solutions for different industries. Norway Post has seen the need for a national solution for digital agreements

– Thomas Mathisen, director of Digipost in Norway Post

Norwegian Post has already acquired its first customer by winning the contract to deliver a electronic signature solution and service to the public sector in Norway. The contract was awarded by the Agency for Public Management and eGovernment (Difi), following a public procurement process. The contract includes development of a portal for signature services, as well as an API solution for integration with any portal. For government use, Norwegian Post will use ID-Porten, which is a central gateway for communication between citizens and the Norwegian government.

“Electronic signatures are a central element in any digitalization strategy, as this will remove the need for manual processes, and increase self-service. A secure, user-friendly and modern solution for electronic signatures will improve and simplify central processes, both for central and local government”, says Mathisen.

It is a challenge that decisions from a municipality to a resident, which is currently sent by e-mail, do not have a verified electronic signature of the sender. Lack of digital options for signatures results in more paper and more manual processes.

– Arne Vidar Haug, director of business developments at Signicat.

Norway Post uses Signicat as supplier of digital identity and electronic signature solutions. Signicat specializes in this area, and has previously delivered solutions to government institutions, such as the Norwegian State Educational Loan Fund (Statens Lånekassen) and the Norwegian Public Service Pension Fund (Statens Pensjonskasse). The government agreement will boost the usage of electronic signatures in many areas.

“In fact, this is about digital accountability and efficiency when interacting with the user. Today, it is a challenge that information which is sent from a municipality to a resident, currently sent by e-mail, do not have a verified electronic signature. Lack of adequate digital options for signatures results in more paper and manual processes. This is something that will be simplified when processes are digital. Just take a look at the efficiency gains of banks have achieved by using electronic signatures”, says Arne Vidar Haug, directory of business development at Signicat.

Pressemelding – Enklere med digitale avtaler i Norge

Direktør for Digipost i Posten, Thomas Mathisen (venstre) og leder for forretningsutvikling hos Signicat, Arne Vidar Haug (høyre). Foto: Posten/Birger Morken

Posten Norge etablerer en signaturtjeneste som gjør det enklere å inngå bindende avtaler digitalt. Tjenesten er valgt av hele offentlig sektor, men kan brukes for alle kontrakter og avtaler man trenger å få signert.

– Det er fortsatt alt for mange områder hvor vi i dag må benytte papir og penn for å inngå avtaler som privatpersoner, sier Thomas Mathisen, direktør for Digipost i Posten. Det er derfor behov for en enkel løsning, som kan brukes på alt fra kontrakter ved salg av bil, til utleiekontrakter, låneavtaler og bekreftelse på valg av skoleplass. Tjenesten som Posten tilbyr vil kunne integreres med den digitale postkassen, Digipost, slik at man enkelt og sikkert kan oppbevare en egen kopi av den signerte avtalen digitalt. Det finnes flere løsninger for digitale signaturer, men de fleste av disse er nisjeløsninger for ulike bransjer. I Posten har vi tydelig sett behovet for en nasjonal løsning for digital avtaleinngåelse, sier Mathisen.

Det finnes flere løsninger for digitale signaturer, men de fleste av disse er nisjeløsninger for ulike bransjer. I Posten har vi tydelig sett behovet for en nasjonal løsning for digital avtaleinngåelse

– Thomas Mathisen, direktør for Digipost i Posten

Posten Norge har allerede fått første kunde på løsningen gjennom å vinne kontrakten for levering av en signeringstjeneste for hele offentlig sektor som ble utlyst av Direktoratet for forvaltning og IKT (Difi). Kontrakten omfatter en selvstendig signeringsportal og en løsning for å integrere digital signering i en hvilken som helst eksisterende nettside. For det offentlige vil tjenesten fra Posten basere seg på bruk av ID-porten.

– Elektronisk signatur er et sentralt element i enhver digitaliseringsstrategi, ettersom dette bidrar til å effektivisere manuelle prosesser og øke graden av selvbetjening. En sikker, brukervennlig og moderne signeringsløsning vil bidra til den å forbedre og forenkle sentrale prosesser for både stat og kommune, sier Mathisen.

Det er en utfordring at for eksempel vedtak fra en kommune til en innbygger som nå sendes digitalt ikke har en verifisert signatur fra avsender, og at mangel på digitale alternativ for signering medfører mer papir og manuelt arbeid.

– Arne Vidar Haug, leder for forretningsutvikling hos Signicat.

Posten benytter Signicat som underleverandør av identitets- og signeringstjenester. Signicat har spesialisert seg på digital identifikasjon og signering og har flere store referanser, blant annet hos Lånekassen og Statens Pensjonskasse. Den offentlige avtalen vil legge til rette for at digital signering kan benyttes på langt flere områder.

– Dette handler egentlig om digital etterrettelighet og effektivisering av brukerdialogen. Det er en utfordring at for eksempel vedtak fra en kommune til en innbygger som nå sendes digitalt ikke har en verifisert signatur fra avsender, og at mangel på digitale alternativ for signering medfører mer papir og manuelt arbeid. Dette er jo noe som burde gjøres bedre når prosessene blir digitale, og ikke dårligere. Bare se hvilke effektiviseringsgevinster bankene har oppnådd ved etablering av avtaleinngåelse med digital signatur, poengterer Arne Vidar Haug, leder for forretningsutvikling hos Signicat.

A Novel Trust Model in Financial Services

The new generations of digital customers see lack of personal contact as an attractive feature. However, players need to provide a high level of confidence to stay in the game.

Players of the financial sector have long strived toward driving down their costs. In part by automating and digitizing business processes. And partly by reducing the extend of personal customer contact and at the same time turning up customer self service.

For instance Danish pension fund PensionDanmark has for some time been working on reducing costs per member to reach 100 Danish kroner per year. So explained pension fund CEO, Torben Møger Pedersen, on Finance IT-Day, which was organized by CFIR and DI ITEK with the headline Transforming Financial Services.

The use of data, mobile devices and apps encourage members to use the services more. The previous focus on costs as the main industry driver is about to be overtaken on the inside.

The millennial generation doesn’t see a lack of human interaction as a lack of service. They see it as a feature they want.

Convenience matters more

The generation that is on the threshold to become customers of banks, insurance companies and pension funds does not see a lack of human contact as a lack of service. On the contrary the Millennium generation see it as a feature they want. Above all it must be easy to use a service and needs to be on the users’ terms. A point emphasized among others by Wharton FinTech in their presentation at Confederation of Danish Industry.

Millennials have grown up with apps on their smartphones and tablets making everything easy. Thus, we anticipate convenience will have more and more impact on their choice of for example bank. Available products and services will continue to be important, but accessibility and how easy it is to use the bank’s services will be increasingly significant to what financial services customers go for.

Convenience will have more and more impact on their choice of bank as well as other online services.

Trust driven by technology

And the shift from trust based on personal contact toward technology-driven trust is a reality. Internet-based services and social media have contributed to boosting this development. Online habits and the anticipation of Millennials and younger generations thus become significant criteria for success with regard to how financial enterprises need to operate in the future. Millennials will be using services from companies they trust.

Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba this summer opened their online bank MYbank which initially offers loans to businesses and private customers. Alibaba’s ambitions go further as explained by Danish Bankers Association CEO Ulrik Nødgaard in his opening address at Confederation of Danish Industry. But to open an account the authorities yet requires a customer to appear in person to identify himself. It is a matter of trust.

However, it is doubtful for how long the traditional banks may remain protected from the global pressure of non-industry players that wish to operate financial activities based on new technology and digital business models. Because technology solutions today completely hold the possibility of digitally identifying persons and companies.

Kill your old business

In the universe of millennials it is pivotal that transactions be based on recommendations, accountability and trust – by all means at the expense of human interaction. This trend creates an inescapable need for the financial enterprise to develop its transactions to feature security and identification. A vital incitement to innovate its business, adjust strategy and renew its processes.

This may require more or less modification of the business to financial players. In some cases rethinking or an actual disruption of the business will be necessary following the motto ‘if you don’t build the thing that will kill your business, someone else will’.

Regardless the extend of change initiatives the ability to create eminent easy-to-use solutions with a high degree of trust in customer interaction will be crucial to new as well as existing – or renewed – players in the financial arena.

Lars Møller Kristensen

Sales Manager at Signicat, Lars Møller Kristensen

Lars Møller Kristensen has been working with IT security and Digital Identity for more than 15 years and been involved in the two national eID infrastructure projects in Denmark. The latest from 2010 used by more than 80% of the Danish population.

Customer story – DNA

DNA has centralized their online identification by using Signicat’s ID services. DNA’s customers can now use TUPAS-banks or Mobiilivarmenne (Mobile-ID) to authenticate themselves. «Before taking Signicat’s services into use, the custom-built solution being used by DNA generated a lot of operative maintenance work, due to a lot of changes in banks credentials among other things. To be able simplify and ease the maintenance, DNA chose to work with Signicat which is one of the experts in digital identities in the Finnish market, making this an easy decision.» says DNA’s Micke Rantanen.

«Signicat has kept up extremely well with our fast paced development»

– Micke Rantanen, DNA Oy – Finland

Signicat Country Manager Antti Harsunen adds: «We are extremely pleased to serve a big Finnish company like DNA. We are working hard every day to fulfill their expectations and we have gone a long way in building trust-based solutions.»

«One of the main objectives for the deal was to simplify the architecture. We wanted to have one centralized solution to substantially decrease the operative maintenance. These objectives have been met with excellent results. Services are being developed with continuous pace and Signicat has kept up with that extremely well»

– Micke Rantanen, DNA Oy

DNA is using Signicat’s digital identity solutions for user enrollment and authentication in several of their online shops and online service. DNA’s customers can do online shopping 24/7 or open up new services anytime. By implementing strong identification, DNA reduces the risk of misuse and enable flexible services to their customers.

Solutions used

About DNA

DNA Ltd is a Finnish telecommunications company providing high-quality voice, data and TV services for communication, entertainment and working.

Click here to download PDF


Signicat opens office in Amsterdam

Trondheim 2015-09-07
Signicat is happy to announce the opening of a new office in Amsterdam.

“This is an important step in our strategy to bring our solutions for digital identity and electronic signatures to European customers” says Signicat’s acting country manager in the Netherlands, Ole Christian Olssøn, VP Sales.

Signicat offers a complete suite of SAAS solutions for identity proofing (Signicat Assure), authentication (Signicat Connect), electronic signatures and seals (Signicat Sign), as well as long-term preservation and archiving of signed documents (Signicat Preserve).

For further information
Ole Christian Olssøn
Beech Avenue 54-60
1119PW Schipol-Rijk
The Netherlands
Mobile: +47 906 92 318
Phone: +31 020 658 6005
E-mail: ole.christian.olsson(at)signicat.com
www.signicat.com

About Signicat

Signicat is one of the leading providers of electronic identity and electronic signature solutions in Europe. The company, founded in 2007, delivers online trust based services to the public and private sector globally. The solutions are used by banks and financial institutions, insurance companies, government agencies and large corporations as well as small and medium sized businesses.

Signicat specializes in cross-border cloud based electronic identity services and electronic signatures. The company has local presence in Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland and the Netherlands. These countries are in the forefront in the world with the usage of digital identities and electronic signatures. Signicat is in the process of expanding into new regions.

Know Your Customers and contract them online with electronic IDs

gunnar nordseth

CEO at Signicat, Gunnar Nordseth

Gunnar Nordseth has more than 20 years of experience with information security, PKI and digital identity, and has since 2006 been CEO of Signicat. Signicat, winner of the 2009 IDDY award from Kantara Initiative, was co-founded by Gunnar in 2006. Gunnar has a master’s degree in numerical mathematics from the Norwegian Institute of Technology.

‘Know your customer’ (KYC) is as important as ever before for the prevention of identity theft and financial fraud, including money laundering and terrorist financing. However, the due diligence activities that are necessary to establish the required level of trust in a customer’s identity have traditionally been cumbersome and expensive. This state of affairs is about to change and to be addressed, as electronic IDs are increasingly being used to onboard customers online. Financial institutions in the Nordic region, Spain and Germany are reporting huge savings and increased attractiveness of their services since eID-based KYC became possible for the first time three years ago. KYC is only one of many areas where use of eIDs are becoming widely accepted and used.

Cost reduction and faster processing are obviously strong motivations for enterprises to start using electronic IDs, but even more important is the fact that customers are now driving e-signature adoption, expecting that a variety of transactions can be finalized online without requiring the use of ink and paper. The main factor that has made this possible is the emergence of strong electronic identity solutions with wide distribution in these countries. Since the beginning of the 2000s, more than 50 million eIDs have been issued to citizens and in the Nordic region, more than 70% of the adult population currently have strong electronic IDs that can be used for KYC purposes.

Financial institutions in the Nordic region, Spain and Germany are reporting huge savings and increased attractiveness of their services since eID-based KYC became possible for the first time three years ago.

Uniting the fragmented eID landscape

The driving forces behind this development have been the banks and the governments, respectively. Among the former are BankID in Norway and Sweden (same name, different organizations and technology), NemID in Denmark, TUPAS in Finland, Neue Personalausweis in Germany and DNI-e in Spain. Other eID issuers are also present in the market, resulting in a situation where presently there is a multitude of issuers of strong eID in Europe. Bank and finance institutions have also been at the forefront when it comes to using the eID infrastructure for innovative purposes. A prime use case example continues to be internet banking, with KYC related to customer acquisition as another successful example, but other, innovative use cases are coming up.

  • Norwegian bankID logo
  • dniE logo
  • NemID logo
  • Swedish BankID logo
  • tupas logo

Some of the eID’s which is being currently being used in Europe
From left to right: Norwegian BankID, Spanish DNI-e, Danish NemID, Swedish BankID, Finnish Tupas):

Electronic signature as killer app

One promising area with huge potential is electronic signature. Denmark’s second largest bank, Nykredit, is currently using Signicat’s electronic signature services for online signing of mortgages and have used the service for millions of signatures. The potential for savings when e-signature is substituted for pen and ink is huge, but even more importantly, this makes the banks’ financial products more available and more attractive to customers.

Cross border operations and eID

The development of eID in the region has mainly been done within a national scope, with limited degree of European coordination. This has resulted in a fragmented infrastructure that presents challenges to service providers wishing to reach a broad audience. For instance, a service provider in Norway who wants to address the largest possible audience would need to implement support for Norwegian BankID, as well as the Buypass eID, the MinID eID and the Commfides eID. If a service provider runs a pan-Nordic operation, which is often the case, they would need to implement support for up to 12 different eIDs. In the absence of a universal (or at least region-wide) eID scheme, the implementation effort soon becomes unmanageable.

Common for these customers is that they need to support all available eIDs in the markets in which they operate, and they do not want to invest heavily in order to implement this.

Identity hubs as new paradigm for solving fragmentation

A new kind of service offering has emerged to address the need for simple integration with the eID infrastructure. Signicat, one of the leading suppliers of this kind of service in Northern Europe, currently has over 100 customers hooked up to its online identity hub. The purpose of the service is to provide easy access for service providers to the eID infrastructure of the Nordic region and beyond. This concept is very similar to the payments industry where PSPs offer the solution to the fragmented landscape of Signicat payment methods. Signicat started to offer its service in Northern Europe, but is now expanding it to the Benelux region and Spain to meet customer’s demand for increased coverage.

Signicat’s customers are typically banks, finance and insurance companies that want to use publicly available eID for strong authentication or electronic signatures. In addition to this, there are also an increasing number of customers doing high-value e-commerce and peer-to-peer lending that have joined up.

Common for these customers is that they need to support all available eIDs in the markets in which they operate, and they do not want to invest heavily in order to implement this. Some of the customers that use Signicat in this way are Banco Santander, BMW Financial Services and large Nordic region insurance and finance companies like SEB, If Insurance and Tryg. Signicat operates as an identity hub. This means that our customers can select which eIDs they want to activate and Signicat sets up a service providing access to the eIDs. In addition to giving access to third-party eIDs, Signicat can also play the part of an eID issuer for customers who want to provide their end-customers with a proprietary eID.

Vision for Europe

Trust and digital identity is a requisite for cross-border transactions. Without trust and digital identity, the growth potential will be limited. Merchants wishing to do cross-border commerce need to know their customers and the only realistic way to do this is through electronic identity. The best solution is to outsource the complexity of identification and authentication to specialists, just as the merchants did with payments. Identity providers not only specialize in protecting customers from identity theft, but also allow customers to re-use their existing IDs and credentials, preventing the build-up of a ‘digital key chain’.

EEMA Announces Signicat as Latest Association Member

Cloud based identity services provider joins European association for identity and security

NORWAY, 7th JULY 2015 – EEMA, the European association for identity and security, today announced Signicat, a leading provider of cloud based identity services, as its latest member. Based in Norway, with offices in Denmark, Finland and Sweden, Signicat has the largest coverage of national e-identity (eID) in Europe.

Senior Development Architect at Signicat, John Erik Setsaas, explains why the organisation has joined EEMA: “It is important for us to keep up-to-date with the latest developments in our field and I know of no other European based trade organisations with the same scope and agenda as EEMA. Becoming a member is important for Signicat as it gives us unprecedented opportunities to engage with a network of professionals that share the same interests, as well as access to useful reports and whitepapers.”

“Signicat is one of the leaders in eID across both Scandinavia and Europe, and we are delighted to welcome them to EEMA.”
David Goodman, Executive Director of EEMA

Executive Director of EEMA, David Goodman, comments: “Through our programme of events, participation in EU projects, regional interest groups and of course our members, EEMA has a strong and well established presence across Europe.” Goodman adds: “This year we have expanded our activities in the Nordics, with the launch of a new regional community in collaboration with Norstella and focused on eID. Signicat is one of the leaders in eID across both Scandinavia and Europe, and we are delighted to welcome them to EEMA.”
This week EEMA will host its 28th annual conference ‘Building Trust in a Hyperconnected World’. The two-day conference takes place on 8th and 9th July at Ditton Manor (near Windsor), UK. For more information visit: www.eema.org and follow EEMA on Twitter: @EEMA1 #hypworld

About EEMA

EEMA, Europe’s independent identity and security association, is a community of members, ambitious to stimulate the development and growth of cross-border personal, business and government transactions and communications across Europe and beyond, through discussion and debate on cutting edge issues in top class networking events.
EEMA offers a wide range of sponsorship and membership packages to suit everyone from large corporates to local government, SMEs to individual academics. Any organisation or individual involved in e-Identity or cybersecurity can apply for membership of EEMA, and start contributing ideas and experiences to shape our digital future.
Visit eema.org for more information, or email: info@eema.org
Follow EEMA on Twitter: @EEMA1

Editorial contact
Graham Thatcher
CHIEF PR
Tel: +44 (0) 7933 673240
Email: graham.thatcher(at)prbychief.com

Norwegian BankID signatures for SuperOffice

A strong team of software developers have combined technology and business knowledge to design and develop a new solution for SuperOffice. Online signature offers SuperOffice users to email quotes and contracts to customers with integrated Norwegian BankID signature capabilities.

«This combined solution from SuperOffice, Adwiza, BankID and Signicat is a new product that essentially makes the whole document signature process fast, easy and secure for all Norwegian SuperOffice users. It also takes customer service to a completely new level.»

– Ole Christian Olssøn, VP Sales, Signicat

Cloud and Mobile

The online signature for SuperOffice combines the unique advantages of «Cloud services» such as scalability, flexibility and cost effectiveness offered through Signicats services. The combination of SuperOffice CRM capabilities, online signature and Norwegian BankID deliver an extremely easy to use and scalable business solution. Further our services meet today’s requirements and needs for mobility and use of mobile devices.

«BankID has been used by the financial services for years and self service has become the main rule. The same effect can be achieved by all industries. We especially appreciate the way BankID is incorporated in a well-known solution like SuperOffice, and hope the users will like the efficiency of electronic signing and thus say goodbye to annoying paper and manual processes.» – Odd Erling Håberget, CEO BankID Norway.

The online signature combined with Norwegian BankID offers several benefits:
No need for printing, faxing or postal service. Signed on any device. Easy to track and followin the the signature process. Signed contracts are available immediately after signing.
Digital signatures can be used in all situations where a handwritten signature is required, and on all types of documents such as loan applications, rental contracts, purchase orders etc. In addition to the Norwegian BankID the solution supports electronic ID’s in all Nordic countries.

«Electronic signature using BankID is a new feature in SuperOffice offered through our partner Signicat. This solution will simplify sales processes and help our customers increase speed, reliability and efficiency in sales»

– Camilla Heidenreich Bommen, Managing Director SuperOffice Norway

The team behind the new signature solution

SuperOffice Customer Relationship Management (CRM) Software helps you track all your customer information in one system and supports all business process from sales, marketing and customer service. SuperOffice CRM is the leading CRM software provider in Europe. With more than 20+ years of international experience, SuperOffice makes managing customers easy.

Signicat is the leading provider of electronic ID and digital signature solutions in Northern Europe. Since 2007, we have supported more than 200 customers improving online customer processes resulting in increased availability, faster time to contract and seamless archiving, with increasing customer satisfaction. We convert our technology expertise to business opportunities for your company.

Adwiza is the leading provider of modules for SuperOffice. Since 2002, we have provided SuperOffice customers with add-on modules for customizing SuperOffice to individual needs or integration with other systems, like ERP systems, telephone systems or online services. Adwiza provides excellence in SuperOffice usability and business value. Adwiza is a SuperOffice strategic partner.

BankID is a personal and simple electronic proof of identity for secure identification and signing online. 3.2 million persons have a BankID. BankID is offered by BankID Partners and is issued by Norwegian banks. BankID Norway is responsible for the sale, operation and development of the service.

For more information:
signicat.com/superoffice

Contact information

Anders Ljungqvist
Partner Manager
+47 917 13 863
info@signicat.com

Digipost offers digital signatures

Norway Post and Signicat cooperates to add integrated digital signatures to Digipost.

There is an increasing demand for solutions to automate document processes. By adding digital signatures as an integrated feature in Digipost, it will now be possible to send anything from lease contracts, preschool applications, employment contracts, as well as bank and insurance agreements.

«For us, it is important that our customer uses digital solutions of the highest quality. The ability to add digital signatures to any document, in a user friendly, platform independent and secure way, will enable our customers to improve the digital document process even further, as well as creating a better customer dialog.»

– Thomas Mathisen, director at Digipost.

signicat and digipost press photo. The picture shows Arne Vidar Haug, head of business development at Signicat and Thomas Mathisen, director at Digipost

Director at Digipost, Thomas Mathisen (left) and head of business development at Signicat, Arne Vidar Haug (right). Photo: Posten/Birger Morken

Since the launch of Digipost in 2011, the Signicat identity solutions have been used for authenticating users. With the new solution, digital signatures from BankID will be added. Both the public and private sector will benefit from a fully integrated product, which includes secure digital mail, messaging and digital signature services.

A safe, user friendly and modern signature solution will contribute to the efficiency, modernization and renewal of key processes demanded by the market.

«The core business of Signicat is to deliver excellent online identity and digital signature services to the private and public sector. As a result of the cooperation with Norway Post, businesses can streamline their processes, with increased benefit for themselves and their customers. Signicat offers secured access to digitization tools to Norway Post and their customers, allowing them to focus on optimizing their business processes»

– Arne Vidar Haug, head of business development at Signicat

About Digipost

  • Digipost is a secure digital mailbox, developed by Norway Post.
  • Free digital mailboxes are offered at digipost.no, to any person over the age of 15.
  • The Norwegian government has decided that digital post shall be the preferred means of communication between the public sector and the citizens of Norway.
  • Digipost has more than 500.000 registered users, and more than 2.000 registered senders.
  • All data is stored encrypted.

Signicat and GSMA partner to offer cloud and mobile authentication

Signicat has today announced its support for the GSMA Mobile Connect service which enables customers to create and manage a universal identity that will securely authenticate them and allow them to safely access mobile and digital services such as e-commerce, banking, health and digital entertainment, as well as e-government portals, via their mobile phones. Signicat’s participation will make mobile authentication easily available to all service providers globally and to Signicat’s more than 200 existing clients within the public and private sector, for internal and external use. Signicat will demonstrate the integration of its identity services with the GSMA.

Mobile Connect solution at Mobile World Congress 2015 in Barcelona 2nd to 5th March at the GSMA Innovation City. The demonstration will show the benefits from using Mobile Connect as a login solution and to open new online accounts.

The GSMA’s Mobile Connect services will complement Signicat’s e-ID portfolio by providing simple, seamless and secure user authentication where consumers use their personal smart device to provide secure access. Consumers increasingly demand convenient and seamless access to all their services, across all their devices regardless of where they are. By incorporating the GSMA’s Mobile Connect service we will enable user friendly, convenient and seamless authentication in Signicat’s Identity Service.

Gjennomføringsgraden økt 40% med BankID uten Java

bankID uten Java

Vi har målt høyere gjennomføringsgrad og færre avbrutte transaksjoner etter at Java-fri BankID ble lansert.

Signicat har vært tidlig ute med å tilby sine bedriftskunder BankID uten Java. Nå foreligger de første erfaringene. Nettsteder og løsninger som har gått over til BankID uten Java har 40 prosent høyere gjennomføringsgrad enn de som kjører den gamle versjonen.

Tilsvarende data for antall avbrutte transaksjoner, der årsak er kjent, for eksempel at Java-løsningen ikke kan brukes på mobile plattformer, viser en reduksjon på tett opp mot 50 prosent.

– Gjennomføringsgrad er en sentralt faktor for både kunder og sluttbrukere, og tallene bekrefter at BankID uten Java er enklere å bruke. Antall avbrutte transaksjoner, der årsak er kjent, forsterker dette bildet, sier Arne Vidar Haug, leder for Forretningsutvikling i Signicat.

Ca 70 % av trafikken Java-fri

BankID Norge AS står bak utviklingen av BankID uten Java som ble lansert 24. september. Målet var å lage en mer brukervennlig løsning som kunne fungere like bra på alle plattformer.

– I underkant av 70 prosent av BankID-bruken skjer på ny løsning. Vi er imponert over at brukerstedene og partnerne kom så raskt i gang. Det betyr mye for oss at BankID oppleves som enkelt, og med Java-fri BankID er vi godt på vei, sier kommunikasjonssjef i BankID Norge, Hege Steinsland.

– Signicat lever av å levere gode online identitets- og signeringstjenester til privat og offentlig sektor. Tilgjengelighet og brukervennlighet er viktig for våre kunder og partnere, sier Haug.

Store forventninger

Forventningene til BankID uten Java har vært store blant banker og andre brukersteder.

– Det er gledelig å kunne vise til konkrete tall som bekrefter at BankID er mer brukervennlig og enklere å bruke enn før. Dette bidrar til økt bruk. Positive brukeropplevelser er noe som gagner både sluttbrukere og tilbydere av tjenester der BankID er sentralt, sier Arne Vidar Haug.

Signicat: Arne Vidar Haug, Leder forretningsutvikling, telefon: 930 60 304

BankID Norge: Hege Steinsland, kommunikasjonssjef, telefon: 900 12 748, e-post: hege.steinsland@bankidnorge.no

Les mer om BankID her

Modern Identity Management Solutions around the World

The management of digital identity is vital to enable the full realization of corporate services on the internet. In particular, interactions that carry a high level of risk face challenges on the Internet, for example the handling of critical data such as health information, financial information, personal information and financial transactions.

Alexandra Institute invites in cooperation with CFIR, Innovation Network for Financial IT and the Council of Digital Security to a conference on modern electronic ID solutions in a global perspective. The target audience is managers, professionals and researchers working with digital ID solutions.

Read more about the conference and subscribe at: http://www.alexandra.dk/2-12-2014 (in Danish)

Signicat nominated for Gazelle of the year

Signicat is nominated for the “Gazelle of the year” prize for the third year in a row. The prize is awarded by Norwegian business newspaper Dagens Næringsliv (www.dn.no), and is given to companies with the highest growth rate in the country

Online Signature for Superoffice

Online Signature
A strong team of software developers have combined technology and business knowledge to
design and develop a new solution for SuperOffice. The Online Signature.
Online Signature offers SuperOffice users to email quotes and contracts to customers
with integrated digital signature capabilities.

“This combined solution from SuperOffice, Adwiza and Signicat is a new product that
essentially makes the whole document signature process fast, easy and secure for all SuperOffice users. It also takes customer service to a completly new level.”
– Lars Møller Kristensen, Signicat

Go to our superoffice page

Cloud and Mobile
The Online Signature for SuperOffice combines the unique advantages of “Cloud services”
such as scalability, flexibility and cost effectiveness offered through Signicats services.
Combined with the strong CRM capabilities delivered by SuperOffice Online Signature is
extremely simple to use and scale in line with business requirements. Further our services meet
today’s requirements and needs for mobility and use of mobile devices.
The Online Signature solution offers several benefits:
1. Customers do no not need to print contracts for traditional handwritten signatures
anymore, so there is no need for paper copies and associated printing and filing costs
2. No cost of postage or other postage related activities
3. The contract may be signed on your device of choice
4. Easy is to track and follow the signature process
5. Signed contracts are available immediately without any delay
Digital signatures can be used in all situations when a handwritten signature is required, and
on all types of documents as loan applications, rental contracts, purchase orders etc.
All the national eID’s in the Nordics, like the Danish NemID and Norwegian BankID is supported.

The team behind the new Online Signature for SuperOffice

Signicat is the leading provider of electronic ID and digital signature solutions. Since 2007, we have supported more than 200 customers in the Nordic countries, improving online customer processes resulting in increased
availability, faster time to contract and seamless archiving, which has led to cost reductions and more new,
satisfied customers. We convert our technology expertise to business opportunities for your company.

Adwiza is the leading provider of modules for SuperOffice. Since 2002, we have provided SuperOffice customers with add-on modules for customizing SuperOffice to individual needs or integration with other systems,
like ERP systems, telephone systems or online services. Adwiza provides excellence in SuperOffice usability
and business value. Adwiza is a SuperOffice strategic partner.

Signicat at IDnext, Amsterdam, 26 November

Signicat will have a keynote at the IDnext workshop in Amsterdam 26 November.

We look at some case studies from public and private sector to show how they are benefiting from using eID, and how Signicat’s online Identity service are reducing complexity by bridging the fragmented e-identity landscape.

If you would like to connect before under or after the event please contact: arne.vidar.haug@signicat.com, +47 93060304

Event page: http://www.idnext.eu/en/calendar/digital-identity-un-update-of-the-latest-developments/

Signicat`s leading European cross border identity cloud service (IDaaS) enables clients to connect to a wide range of identity issuers and open standards alike and enables log-on, authentication, id verification, signature, timestamp and archiving services through a single point of entry. This creates trust, protects consumers and fights against fraud. Realizes clients to do high value business purely online.

Today more than 200 customers trust Signicat to deliver cross-border authentication and electronic signature services.

Signicat at Cartes Secure Connexions 2014, Paris, 4 November

Signicat will speak about ‘Unlocking the True Value of Digital Identity by re-using Identity Solutions’ at 2:00 pm, 4 November, track ‘Privacy in the Digital Society (Secure Identity, Fraud, ID Management)’

This presentation will show you how Digital Identity can be used in electronic workflows in a bid to increase sales, improved customer satisfaction (self-service), reduce costs, enable operational efficiencies and enhance security. We look at some case studies from public and private sector to see how this is solved and how to reduce fragmentation in a scattered market.

If you would like to connect before, under or after the event please contact: arne.vidar.haug@signicat.com, +47 93060304

Signicat`s leading European cross border identity cloud service (IDaaS) enables clients to connect to a wide range of identity issuers and open standards alike and enables log-on, authentication, id verification, signature, timestamp and archiving services through a single point of entry. This creates trust, protects consumers and fights against fraud. Realizes clients to do high value business purely online.

Today more than 200 customers trust Signicat to deliver cross-border authentication and electronic signature services.

Event page: http://www.cartes.com/Conference/2014-Conference-Programme

Signicat at eSignRecords 2014, November 12-13, New York City

Signicat will be present at the eSignRecords conference 12.-13 November in New York City.

Signicat`s leading cross border identity cloud service (IDaaS) enables clients to connect to a wide range of identity issuers and open standards alike and enables log-on, authentication, id verification, signature, timestamp and archiving services through a single point of entry. This creates trust, protects consumers and fights against fraud. Realizes clients to do high value business purely online.

Today more than 200 customers trust Signicat to deliver cross-border authentication and electronic signature services.

If you would like to connect before, under or after the event please contact: arne.vidar.haug@signicat.com, +47 93060304

Event page: http://www.americanbanker.com/conferences/esra/

Signicat at eID & ePass 6th edition, Budapest, 13.-14 October

Signicat is proud to be one of the sponsors at the eID and Passport conference in Budapest 13.-14. October
If you would like to connect before, under or after the event please contact: roger.skjetlein@signicat.com
Event page: https://www.eid-epass.org

Signicat`s leading European cross border identity cloud service (IDaaS) enables clients to connect to a wide range of identity issuers and open standards alike and enables log-on, authentication, id verification, signature, timestamp and archiving services through a single point of entry. This creates trust, protects consumers and fights against fraud. Realizes clients to do high value business purely online.

Today more than 200 customers trust Signicat to deliver cross-border authentication and electronic signature services.

Digipost først med Java-fri BankID 2.0

Signicat delivers Bank IDPosten logoDigipost logo

Oslo, 24.september 2014
Posten kan som første norske bedrift tilby sine kunder å ta i bruk Java-fri BankID 2.0. I første omgang vil BankID 2.0 benyttes for registrering av nye brukere og åpning av brev i Postens digitale postkasse, Digipost. Senere vil denne også nyttes av andre av Postens tjenester. Løsningen leveres som en tjeneste gjennom det norske programvareselskapet Signicat.

Dermed har Posten i samarbeid med Signicat løst problemet brukere har hatt med å identifisere seg med BankID på Digipost og andre nettsteder som følge av manglende støtte for Java. Med BankID 2.0 kreves det ikke Java installert på klienten, dermed vil Digipost-brukerne nå kunne få en Java-problemfri brukeropplevelse, både på pc, nettbrett og smarttelefon.

BankID 2.0 Screenshot

– Digipost sine kunder skal møte digitale løsninger av topp klasse. Rask, effektiv og problemfri opprettelse og tilgang til sin egen postkasse på nett tas som en selvfølge. For at Digipost skal fremstå som attraktiv, moderne og fremtidsrettet er det viktig at teknologien ikke skaper hindringer. Det var en utfordring med Java-basert BankID. Det var derfor naturlig for oss å være tidlig ute med å ta i bruk BankID 2.0 uten Java. Vi er stolte over å være først ute – også foran bankene, sier direktør for Digipost, Thomas Mathisen.

Vi er stolte over å være først ute – også foran bankene, sier direktør for Digipost, Thomas Mathisen

– Signicat lever av å levere gode online identitets- og signeringstjenester til privat og offentlig sektor. Tilgjengelighet og brukervennlighet er viktig for kunder som Posten. BankID 2.0 understøtter dette på en god måte, det er derfor gledelig at Posten viser vei med å ta i bruk den nye BankID applikasjonen. Med Signicat er Posten og øvrige kunder sikret at alle endringer og oppdateringer på BankID blir ivaretatt raskt og effektivt, slik at de kan konsentrere seg om optimalisering av sine forretningsprosesser, sier Arne Vidar Haug, leder forretningsutvikling i Signicat.

Mediekontakter

Posten Norge: pressetelefon 951 48 000
Signicat: Arne Vidar Haug, Leder forretningsutvikling, telefon: 930 60 304

Om Digipost

Digipost er et nasjonalt postsystem utviklet av Posten Norge AS. Alle innbyggere over 15 år har mulighet til å opprette en egen digital postkasse, hvor de kan sende, motta og arkivere viktig post. Alle data sendes og lagres kryptert i Norge. Over 350 000 har tatt i bruk løsningen.

Om Signicat

Signicat AS er ledende i Europa på elektronisk identitetshåndtering og elektronisk signatur. Signicat tilbyr kunder og partnere i Norden en enkel og enhetlig måte å håndtere utfordringer innen e-ID og eSignatur. Dette gjøres med en åpen, skalerbar og fleksibel skytjeneste, som gjør det enkelt å tilby identitetshåndtering og elektronisk signatur. Løsningen brukes av mange større aktører innen offentlig og privat sektor, som Lånekassen, Santander, SEB, If, Tryg forsikring, Gassco og Posten Norge. Les mer på www.signicat.com

Signicat at future payments conference

Signicat will present a customer case at the annual conference Nordic Card Markets and Future Payment Solutions showing some of the award winning electronic ID and Digital Signature solutions we provide to a number of large companies all over the Nordic countries. Helping our customers to be compliant with regulations, optimize customer processes.

The conference will be arranged 19-20. january, 2015 in Copenhagen.

fennia

Fennia outsourced authentication

Finnish insurance company Fennia has successfully outsourced Online authentication to Signicat. Fennia tells that after thorough investigation Signicat is the right choice and integrates well to their SOA architecture. “This was natural for us to outsource this kind of service to a company, whose business it is!”, says Development Manager Maarit Ekokoski from Fennia.

Lue koko uutinen suomeksi

NemID validation before accessing the Danish CPR register

The Danish Ministry of Economy and Interior affairs issued late 2013, a notice of claim requiring the use of NemID before accessing the CPR register on public accessible websites – see article on cpr.dk

With Signicat’s NemID package it is a simple project to comply with the Ministry’s requirements. Contact us for more information about the solution.

 

Økonomi- og Indenrigsministeriet udstedte i efteråret 2013 et varsel om krav af brug af NemID før opslag i CPR registret på offentlige tilgængelige websider – se artikel på cpr.dk

Med Signicat’s NemID pakke er det en smal sag at overholde ministeriets krav. Kontakt os for yderligere informationer om løsningen.

Come visit us at Finance IT day 2014 in Copenhagen, September 11th

This years Finance IT Day will be held on September 11, 2014 at the beautiful conference center at Axelborg. The Finance IT Day conference addresses decision makers in IT and business development. At the conference, focus is on the requirements of IT operations, as a prerequisite for gaining valuable business from the financial sector of the future. Because the conference has an international appeal and draws on an international network, the conference will be held in English.

The program of the conference is both plenary and divided into tracks during the day.

Date: September 11, 2014 – 8.30-16.30
Type1 day conference

Venue: Axelborg – Vesterbrogade 4A – 1620 København V, Denmark

Fee: The conference is free of charge for directors and decision makers within the financial industry. Ordinary delegates fee is DKK 4,995 not including VAT.​

Organizer: CFIR and CAC Card Academy

The difference between an SDO and a PAdES, and why it concerns YOU

Graphics difference between PAdES and SDO

The SDO, a Signed Data Object, is a common abstraction layer between a document and any signature, and it is an industry standard. There are many formats, but they all boil down to an XML file containing the file or a reference to the file, and the signature. This format is far more flexible than, say, a PDF that is signed directly, partly because a greater number of file formats can be signed, but also because it’s possible to verify the signature without adding the Certificate Authority (CA) to that computer’s trust store.

Non-repudiation is what it’s all about – the principle that the validity of the signature is beyond question. By looking up the certificate in the corresponding OCSP (Online Certificate Status Protocol) or CRL (Certificate Revocation Lists) service, one can determine the current validity of any certificate used to sign the SDO. There is a problem with this, however – the SDO contains no information about whether the certificate was valid when the signing took place, only whether it is so now. In other words, an SDO is valid as long as the certificate used to sign it is valid. If it is expired or revoked, the SDO’s validity can be questioned. Since four years is the most common validity period of a personal certificate, and most people won’t use a brand new certificate to sign a document, once can assume that the useful lifespan of an SDO is about two years.

This is fine for many enterprises. The document is signed and never looked at again. However, if needed, there are ways around this limitation.

The simplest and most elegant way is to ask for a signed OCSP response when the document is signed, and store it with the document. This can either be stored in a separate log – in fact, any serious integration partner will do so anyway – or packaged with the signature. In the latter case, the signature can be said to contain Long Term Validation (LTV) information. Some signing methods, most notably Norwegian BankID, also do this natively. Your SDO is now an LTV-SDO, and has a useful lifespan of about five years.

Why only five years? Nothing lasts forever, and encryption algorithms are certainly no exceptions. An encryption algorithm is only useful as long as no one has the ability to compromise it. With advances in hardware and software technology, you can be certain that at some point in time, the encryption can no longer be considered secure enough to ensure the non-repudiation of the signature. At this point, even your LTV-SDO is past its useful lifespan.

This is where PAdES comes into the picture. This is currently the most advanced signature format available. You can encapsulate an LTV-SDO or any other signature containing LTV information, regular PDFs, and perhaps a signed timestamp. The entire package is signed with a PDF signing certificate issued by a globally trusted CA.

The most visible advantage, and perhaps the one that springs to most people’s minds first, is that the result is readable without specialised software – you just need a regular PDF reader. However, there is a even greater advantage, which is that the PAdES can be resealed with a fresh PDF signature at any point, to ensure that the contents aren’t tampered with for the next five years or so. If this is done regularly, the non-repudiation of the signed document can be ensured almost indefinitely.

Do I need to send the signed document to another party?
Do I need to verify the signature offline?
Do I need to verify the signature 10 or more years into the future?

If the answer is yes to any of these questions, you need PAdES.

est eid logo

Signicat launches support for Estonian ID Card

esteid logoSignicat with the highest coverage of eIDs in Europe launches support for Estonian ID Card and enable their customers access to the Baltic market.

Signicat now supports Estonian ID Card enabling access to more than 1.2 million users. Estonian ID Card as one of the accepted and major standards for providing eID to the users in Estonia are now integrated into the Signicat ecosystem and further expands the current support for more than 60 millions identities.

Signicat hosts breakfast seminar about optimized processes in the insurance industry

Most of the larger Danish insurance companies were represented when Signicat hosted a breakfast seminar about optimized processes in the insurance industry.
GF Forsikring presented their recent project targeted at improving the customer experience for new customers, and Signicat presented solutions supporting this using both national eIDs and alternative methods.

GF forsikring presenting their project

GF forsikring presenting their project

You can download the presentations (in danish language) by entering your email using this link

 

Elisa and signicat partnership

Strong electronic cross-border authentication solution from Elisa for the Nordic Region

Cooperation between Norwegian Signicat, a supplier of electronic authentication solutions, and Elisa enables a strong electronic authentication of citizens in connection of network affairs for Nordic companies and organizations. Instead of using several authentication providers, the citizens of different Nordic countries can be authenticated with one solution. The new service significantly facilitates the operation of Nordic companies, increases business opportunities and offers consumer customers a safer and more convenient way to work in the network outside the borders of one’s own country.

 

The cooperation of Elisa and Signicat will offer the Nordic companies and organisations an opportunity to authenticate all Nordic customers and make electronic transactions easier for their own clients. Service providers do not need to maintain several authentication systems or separate contracts in each country anymore.

– The new authentication solution is a remarkable benefit for companies, the public sector and other organisations, since it is possible to authenticate all Nordic customers with one solution. No Finnish service provider has ever been able to authenticate as many users with one solution. In practice, the solution will be beneficial for all people in the Nordic region in the future, when they wish, for example, to order a new credit card, get competing insurance bids, get a loan, shop in a network store or play in different gaming services, says Vice President Anna-Mari Ylihurula from the Customer Interaction Services at Elisa.

Now Signicat will make Elisa’s mobile authentication service international by providing it to all its Nordic customer organisations. Reception has been very good, Elisa’s Mobile certificate solution will first be utilised in well-known Nordic financial services. The best known customers of Signicat include, for example, Santander Consumer Bank and SEB.

– Our Mobile certificate offering is a new and exciting addition to our current range of services. We believe the partnership with Elisa will bring value to our existing customers as well as to the market in general. Signicat is a leader in developing and bringing new secure services to the market, and our mobile certificate offering will help helping partners and customers build and market new electronic services in this area. The partnership with Elisa offers significant new development and business opportunities to our customers, says managing director Gunnar Nordseth from Signicat.

In the strong electronic authentication service offered by Elisa, Nordic customers can be authenticated with a single authentication method. Finnish service provider can authenticate all its Nordic customers through one solution, and Finns can use a Finnish mobile certificate for authentication in Swedish, Norwegian and Danish services. The solution enables remarkably wider customer authentication than before, because it is not restricted to the customers of certain authentication system administrator, such as a bank.

Additional information:

Elisa Corporation, Perttu Hörkkö, Business Development Manager, Business Customers, +358 50 324 9373, perttu.horkko@elisa.fi

Signicat AS,  Gunnar Nordseth, CEO, +47 930 60 408, gunnar.nordseth@signicat.com

Elisa is a telecommunications and ICT service company. Our online and ICT services provide Finns with experiences, and businesses with productivity. We serve approximately 2.2 million consumers, companies and public administration organisations. As the market leader in mobile subscriptions, we offer the most comprehensive and the fastest 3G network and 4G speeds in Finland. In 2010, our revenue was €1.46 billion and we employed 3,600 people. We offer international services in partnership with Vodafone and Telenor. For more details, go to www.elisa.com

Signicat  is a Nordic IT company specialising in digital identity. Its main product is the leading European cloud based identity service Signicat ID, which makes it simple for customers to offer secure identification and electronic signature. Several of the leading Nordic companies have chosen Signicat as provider of strong authentication and binding agreement confirmation on the Internet. The customer list includes Bank Santander, SEB Group, If Insurance, Tryg, Gassco and the Norwegian Postal Service. More details are available at www.signicat.com

sign document smartphone illustration

Mobile PDF signature with Norwegian BankID [NOR]

 

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Mobile PDF Signing

Egenskaper

  • Signering av PDF med BankID på mobil
  • Enkel å implementere
  • Økt gjennomføringsgrad
  • Gir merverdi til eksisternde BankID tjeneste
  • Forbedret brukeropplevelse
  • Høyt sikkerhetsnivå
  • Kunden slipper kodebrikke

 

PDF signering med BankID på mobil

Nå trenger du ikke lenger legge bort mobilen eller nettbrettet for å signere med BankID.

Elektronisk signering av avtaler og dokumenter når stadig nye høyder i takt med at flere og flere tjenester utføres på nettet. Sterk identifisering og signering er en helt sentral komponent i svært mange av disse tjenestene. En kjent utfordring har vært den eksplosive veksten i bruk av mobiler og nettbrett, uten at disse har hatt støtte for java til signering.

Signer direkte på markedsledende mobile plattformer

Med støtte for PDF Signering med BankID på mobil, kan du nå signere direkte med mobilen uten kodebrikke. Dette gir betydelig bedre kundetilfredshet gjennom bl.a tilgjengelighet og brukervennlighet. Erfaringer viser at PDF signering med BankID på mobil forbedrer gjennomføringsgrad med opptil 30 %. En gjenkjennelig løsning, enkel å bruke og tilgjengelighet er noe av bakgrunnen for den økte gjennomføringsgraden. Dokumentet eller teksten som skal signeres, åpnes og vises direkte i den mobile enheten.

Signicat – først ute med det siste

Med Signicat som leverandør av id- og signeringstjenester, er din virksomhet posisjonert til å være helt i tet på dette området. Tilgjengelig via våre vanlige grensesnitt.

Hvordan kommer vi i gang?

Bestill løsningen hos Signicat, så tar vi oss som vanlig av resten.

Kontakt
Petter Iversen
Tel: +47 952 78 678
petive@signicat.com
Ole Christian Olssøn
Tel: +47 906 92 318
oleols@signicat.com

 

Signicat attended section of Finance E-conference Norway

Held last week in Oslo, many of the stakeholders within the Norwegian Finace was gathered at the E-conference. Signicat attended as a sponsor and received good feedback from many of the 250 participants.

About the event http://event.tu.no/finansnaeringens-digitaliseringskonferanse/

Finansnæringens Digitaliseringskonferanse 2014 IMG_0513

eID-Network Conference, Brussels

As the leading provider of cloud based identity services and digital signatures in Europe, Signicat is a partner at the European eID Network Event in Brussels, March 20th 2013.

The eID network conference focuses on eID in relation to online services toward persons, businesses and governments. The unquestionable advantages related to cost, revenue and efficiency by moving business processes towards an online self service environment, is well proven and acknowledged.

It benefits all parties regardless of industry and relationship, whether it’s B2B, B2C, B2E or G2C. To advance this processes in a national or cross border perspective, a secure and confident online identification is one of the most crucial parts for a successful progress.

Signicat have specialized in secure online identity services and handles more than 20 million eID’s around Europe, and more than 40 millions by the end of 2013.

As a speaker on eID Network event, we will share with you our expertise and experience since the early 2000’s. We wish you welcome to visit us at eID Network Conference.

More about the eID-Network Conference here